Splash Spring 16
Course Catalog


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Arts

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A2035: Modern Digital Photography Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jason Liu

We will take a tour through modern photography: how "big cameras" (DSLRs) work, digital editing, and the printing/display process. Contemporary art will be shown and then you will learn how to make your own photos better on your phone. You will learn how to shoot better in low light situations and how to capture the photo you want with the right angle.


Prerequisites
You need a phone with a camera.

A2067: Preamble to Picasso
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Angela Chen

Often hailed as the genius of modern art, Pablo Picasso began his journey towards artistic stardom as a classical artist with refined tastes. Gradually, his choices became more purposeful and his vision more unique. With over 10,000 works, Picasso left a huge repetoire and legacy. This survey class will focus on select Picasso pieces that cover all of his major periods, including Blue, Rose and Cubist, in the context of the social and artistic history at the time. No previous knowledge of art history or Picasso is required.


Prerequisites
None.

A2026: Intro to Playwriting
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Susan Yassky

Everyone has something to say. Everyone has a story to tell. How will you tell your story? The playwright has the ability to recreate the world from his or her unique perspective. How do you see the world, and how will you put that world on the page? In this class, we'll talk about writing dialogue, developing characters, and crafting scenes. You will also learn techniques for coming up with ideas and beating writer's block.


Prerequisites
Bring a notebook and something to write with!

A2017: Conquering Our Fears: Public Speaking Edition
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jamie Bingham

Are you petrified of public speaking? Does the thought of large groups make you queasy? Have you contemplated skipping town on the days when you have oral presentations? If you answered yes to any or all of the above questions - this class is for you!

My class will provide you with lots of fun and informative ways to be a successful public speaker. We will talk delivery, content and more as we delve into the dying art of oratory.

In addition to learning the tricks of the trade we will be having a small, friendly, competition for everyone willing to participate that will involve some cool prizes. Keep in mind that participation in the competition is completely voluntary so those of you who are still a little shy are more than welcome to join the fun!

A2092: Chinese Caligraphy Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Makana Williams

A relaxing introduction to Chinese characters and the art of caligraphy! Caligraphy pens and paper provided.


Prerequisites
None, just an interest in learning about Chinese characters and culture.

A1983: Figure Drawing: A Crash Course Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Lawrence

Stuck on stick figures? Baffled by bone structure? Perplexed by proportion? Have no fear! We'll learn a little bit of theory about anatomy and proportion, and then jump right in to drawing the human figure in all its gory detail.


Prerequisites
Bring your best skeleton pun.

A1980: Intro to Acapella Arranging Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Xinyuan Chen

Shows like The Sing-Off and Pitch Perfect are lots of fun to watch, but a lot goes into a real acapella group. We have to rehearse for hours and hours before we can go make music on stage. Not to mention actually making the songs we sing! In this class we'll be going over some considerations and philosophies for arranging for voices. Bring a favorite song! Time permitting, we'll arrange some of it!


Prerequisites
Do you know what a chord is? You're probably fine. Do you know what a chord progression is? Extra bonus points good job.

A2032: Before Microsoft Word
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Han

An introduction to typography and letterpress printing. We'll briefly cover the history of printing, get acquainted with a few popular typefaces, learn some principles of typesetting, and finish up with a tour of one of Yale's own letterpresses!

A2006: The Power of Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ashia Ajani

In this class, students will explore the world of spoken word poetry and political poetry, and see how it can be used to express feelings, hopes, dreams, and as a powerful mechanism for social change and critique. Some artists viewed (through video or through text) include Key Ballah, Emi Mahmoud, Crystal Valentine and Ken Arkind.

A1974: Writing Sketch Comedy Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Madeline Kaplan

Why are some sketches better than others? Why are Key & Peele so consistently successful? And why should we expect the third question in this list to be funny? (Hint: A little something called "the rule of three.") Learn the basics of sketch-writing by watching and analyzing some great comedy. No previous experience required!

A2043: How to draw basic cartoons.
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Heidi VanderWel

Learn how to draw the basics with an emphasis on the Peanuts!

A1970: Classical Compositions in American Art
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Thomas Gould

An introduction to and historical review of art compositions, and how the rules and techniques are relevant to the works of American artists Winslow Homer, N.C. Wyeth, and Norman Rockwell.

A2051: The Art of Slam Poetry Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Carleen Liu

An introduction for students on how to write and perform slam poetry, taught by members of TEETH Slam Poets at Yale

A2046: Beatlemania
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kuan Jiang

Ladies and gentlemen... The Beatles! This course will cover a brief history of the band, starting from their humble beginnings in Liverpool to their last recording session at Trident Studios. We will also discuss key post-1970 events and their influence in today's culture. Throughout the class, we will listen to the band's recordings and analyze the evolution in their sound as they progressed. Fans and non-fans alike are welcome to take this course. Come learn about one of the greatest rock bands of all time!


Engineering

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E1937: How Does a Pipe Organ Work? Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

Many of us have heard the sound of these huge instruments, but how do they work? They turn out to be quite simple. Using a small model of an organ, we will go over how this magnificent instrument functions and, in brief, every element of its construction.

E1954: Information and Computation: Physical Foundations
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Spencer Rogers

An introduction to theories of information storage and manipulation in physical systems, followed by a study of silicon logic gates and biological computers. Theoretical concepts draw from statistical thermodynamics and include configuration space, degrees of freedom, microstates and macrostates, and entropy. Course aims include providing a deep understanding of information representation and communication.


Prerequisites
f(x) as representing a function associating some object with some object x, the natural logarithm

E2012: Making A Robot Full!
Difficulty: *

Want to make a robot? Interested in robotics or how robots work?

Come make a bristlebot, a small vibrating robot that can be made from an electric toothbrush, and learn about robots!

This course may require students to share tools such as scissors and tape with other students. Please sign up for this course only if you are ok with sharing (sharing is caring!).


Prerequisites
Explicitly no programming or soldering experience is required.

E1936: Make a Motor
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

We will learn how electric motors work, as well as create our own simple models of a motor.


Humanities

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H2089: The Buckley Program: Federalist 10
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Madeline Fortier

This course will emphasize the political philosophy and theory behind the American Founding. It will broadly cover the American Founding and the Federalist Papers, with a specific focus on Federalist 10. Within Federalist 10, we will examine Madison's portrayal of factionalism, majoritarian rule as a form of tyranny, the nature of Madisonian republicanism (as opposed to democracy), and the role of government.


Prerequisites
Read and annotate Federalist 10 (http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa10.htm) Interests in and general knowledge of US history and government

H1934: Faith in Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

As the title suggests, this class is about two subjects: faith and poetry. We all have faith in things - we believe in ideas, people, and even places. Whether you have read much poetry or not, you will soon learn that it is the perfect place to convey reflections on faith. Come along as we read a selection of fantastic poems and attempt to understand the faith of poets. In the process, we will seek to learn about our own faith, as well.

H1950: The Soviet Union Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexander Jacobson

This class will offer a introduction to the history of the Soviet Union, a nation which existed from 1917 to 1991. We will cover the October Revolution, the construction of industry in Russia, the Second World War, the nuclear arms race, and the fall of the USSR.

H2061: The Buckley Program: A Crash Course to the 2016 Election-how to be an informed voter
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Karina Kovalcik

In this course I will walk students through the american voting system (primaries, caucuses, delegates, the party system), how to be an informed voter, who the candidates are,and some of their beliefs.


Prerequisites
just an interest in understanding the american voting system and how to be an informed voter

H2009: The Science of Language
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Yerin Kim

We use it every day, but have you ever thought about where language comes from? Or how it affects how you think? How does one even test these questions scientifically?
Specific topics we will cover in this class include the biological basis of language, and the validity of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. We will focus especially on using specific case studies to answer the above questions in a systematic manner.

H1962: The Sonnet: Poetry of the Heart
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Logan Zelk

The sonnet is for many, and for me, the quintessential poetic form. There are many iterations of the sonnet throughout the centuries, each with an individual pulse. This class will go over the characteristics of what makes a sonnet a sonnet, and then will investigate how sonnets changed according to the times and author.


Prerequisites
An interest in the class!

H2013: Greek Tragedy Today
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Malina Buturovic

Greek tragedy was beloved in its day, and remains a beloved source for playwrights and authors today. We will read passages from more traditional translations of Greek tragedy and passages from modern-day adaptation that use the plots and language of Greek tragedy to address modern political contexts.


Prerequisites
having read a translation of a Greek tragedy is helpful, but not necessary

H2027: The Art of the Political Campaign Ad
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bernard Stanford

Positive ads. Negative ads. Those that spell it out, and those that leave it to the viewer's imagination. The creative, the moving, the terrifying, and the absurd. This class covers them all. Drawing on the best ads from US, Indian, Israeli, and Taiwanese elections, this class will go over what makes ads effective and will feature a rundown of the all-time greatest hits.

H1928: Gay Pride, Gender Outlaws, and Radical Love Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Gray Golding

Come learn about the LGBTQ+ world history and culture that your AP World teacher will never tell you was queer–from ancient Rome to China's Han Dynasty to the the Wild West and more.

H1925: Model College Admissions Committee Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

In this session, students will explore issues relating to college admissions by roleplaying a college admissions officer making recommendations on whom to admit to the Dean of Admissions. After discussing model candidates and voting (or intensely arguing) about the outcomes, there will be opportunity for Q+A.

The teacher of this class used to work in undergraduate admissions for a highly selective college.

H1955: Nothing
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Qianyi Qin

Have you ever thought about the idea of “nothing”? We live in a world full of things. Look around your bedroom and you will see pens, chairs, lamps. Look out of the window and there are trees, streets and people walking by. Where can you see “nothing”? It’s really quite impossible for us to imagine what nothing looks like! European metaphysics has historically concerned itself with things and being. Yet in order to articulate what things are and what they do, philosophers often made use of the concept of nothing. Leibniz, for example, formulated the most fundamental philosophical question as “Why is there something rather than nothing?” But still, the meaning and function of “nothing” remains obscure.

Is nothing something? What kind of thing is it? Are there different kinds of nothing? How can we even speak of “nothing" when we can’t find its referent in this world? Nothing seems to be total negation of all the things that we obviously have in this world and therefore is a meaningless linguistic formulation. But negative terms like “non”, “not”, “-less”, “void”, “absence” and ”void” can be important to philosophical projects. Ancient Chinese thinker Lao Zi says that “Nameless is the beginning of heaven and earth.” The Buddha tells us that the world is empty “insofar as it is empty of a self or of anything pertaining to a self.” 

In this class, we will explore the idea of nothing with the help of texts from ancient Chinese thought, Buddhism and western philosophy. We will also share our experiences of nothing (if we have any experiences of it!). Come to this class if you enjoy perplexity and thinking about nothing!

H1975: The Aztec And Inca Civilizations Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Hunter Ford

From the humblest of origins, the Aztec and Inca people forged two of the greatest civilizations the world has ever seen. Together we'll explore out what life was like in these incredible empires and find out how their legacy lives on today.

H1941: Pirates on the High Seas
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Aaron Segal

If ye be wantin' to learn what it was really like to sail the high seas under the black flag, and to hear the true and grisly tales of the world's most fearsome pirates, come aboard! See how ye'd do as a buccaneer captain in the 17th century!

H2040: The Literary History of the Superhero
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Oliver Orr

An exciting look into the literary, historical, and philosophical movements that lead to the creation of the "Superhero," starting with the very dawn of literature and moving through to the 21st century. We'll briefly cover authors, artists, and thinkers from Homer, Freud, Mary Shelley, and Emma Orczy to Bob Kane, Alan Moore, and Stan Lee. We'll discuss topics like the Hero's Journey, the metanarrative, the id, ego, and superego, and objective morality. Ultimately, we'll learn about what it means to stand for Truth, Justice, and the American Way.


Prerequisites
A love of learning and a passion for superheroes!

H1929: Major Moments in Urban Planning
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Gray Golding

An exploration of some of the major ideas and forces that have shaped the way cities work throughout history, and into the future!

H1953: Coldplay: Music and Art Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

From the classic sounds of "Clocks" and "Yellow" to modern hits like "Paradise" and "Hymn for the Weekend," Chris Martin and his band, Coldplay, have produced a powerful body of musical and artistic work. In this class, we will aim to understand Coldplay's music thematically, identifying possible meanings of songs, lyrics, and album covers. Whether you are a seasoned fan or only know a song or two, join us as we enjoy and understand great art.

H2065: The Buckley Program: Conservatism, Liberalism, and Progressivism. What do they all mean? Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Altman

This election cycle has thrown around the words Conservatism, Liberalism, and Progressivism without much explanation. These philosophies run much deeper than the rhetoric employed by candidates on either side of campaign trail. This course aims to provide a foundation for understanding how these political philosophies diverge and cohere, and it also seeks to frame the 2016 election as something beyond the typical Conservative/Progressive-Liberal matchup we are so accustomed to.

H1931: Intro to France and French Conversation
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Peter Wyckoff

This course is designed to give you a very basic grasp of French conversation and France. The main goal is to equip the student with the basic tools one would need when going to France.
The first part of class, we will discuss basic points of French conversation, from Hello/Thank you, to "Where is x?" through games and mutlimedia.
The second part of the class will give a brief introduction to France and Paris with bits of songs, movies and lots of pictures.

H2060: The Art of Teatime Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Maxine Dillon

This class will be a primer on the English tradition of afternoon tea. We'll learn about the history of teatime and explore its role in English literature, as well as have a little tea party of our own!


Prerequisites
Come with some room in your stomach for teatime treats!

H2050: Understanding Palestine
Difficulty: **

Understanding the Israel/Palestine conflict through examining history, rights, and current dialogue.


Prerequisites
n/a

H2053: The Historical, Religious and Medical Significance of Circumcision
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Grant Berland

Circumcision has been around for thousands of years in multiple cultures, but many people don't know the social, historical, religious, and medical significance and controversies associated with it. This class will examine just the tip of the iceberg of circumcision by examining the origins of circumcision; the religious significance of circumcision in Judaism, Christianity, and other world religions; the rising and falling prevalence of circumcision from the 1700s until the present; and the scientific and medical reasons circumcision has been useful, especially in the AIDS epidemic in Africa.


Prerequisites
None

H2010: Talk Healthy to Me: An Intro to Global Health
Difficulty: *

Global health in an hour? Although seemingly ambitious, this course will attempt to touch upon the major factors that affect the health of individuals around the world. Specifically, we will focus on the overlapping roles that health, education, and international organizations like UNICEF play in impacting global health. Find out how individuals like Shakira, Selena Gomez, and even YOU can make a difference in the lives of others.


Prerequisites
None, only enthusiasm and interest in our course!

H2077: The Buckley Program: Hamilton: Champion of Federalism Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Bedard

Alexander Hamilton was the great administrator of the founding era, creating expansive plans for government from an early age. From serving under General Washington during the American Revolution, to fighting for the ratification of the Constitution through the Federalist Papers, Hamilton was an ardent proponent of strong a Federalist policy. This class will analyze his policy versus the modern adaptation of federal government through primary sources.

H2084: The Hero's Journey Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kuan Jiang

The Hero's Journey, also known as the monomyth, is the path that all heroes must take on their quest for adventure. Come learn about each step and see how you are being a hero everyday in your life!

H1972: Great Commanders
Difficulty: **

What does it take to lead an army to victory against overwhelming odds? Together we'll explore the basics of military strategy and learn about the visionary commanders who reshaped world history on the battlefield.

H2028: Politics and Action Movies
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jack Hilder

Action movies and politics: at first glance, they might seem as far apart as two topics can get. But upon closer inspection, we can see all kinds of interesting connections. Want to know how "The Hunger Games" relates to Hillary Clinton, what "The Dark Knight" has to do with the War on Terror, and much more? Take this class to find out.

H2008: Listen Up
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Orozco

Listen up! Why and how do we listen? What noises are around us that we've grown to accept? What noises bother us that we can't seem to forget? How well do you know your neighborhood? What does it mean to walk around listening to an i-Pod? Interested in the philosophy and psychology behind sounds and our perception of them?

H2001: Riddling in Anglo-Saxon England
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Shu-han Luo

Come exercise your powers of thought and imagination as we enjoy a selection of Anglo-Saxon riddles, while learning some foundations of reading Old English.


Prerequisites
No prior knowledge of Old English required.

H1964: Existentialism and Inter-subjectivity Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Logan Zelk

Starting with Kierkegaard, and going to Husserl, Heidegger and Sartre, we delineate a philosophy that captures the biggest problems of humanity: what it means to be, why are we here, and why is everything something and not nothing?

And then from there we will look at how investigating what it means to be then creates issues on how we interact with others. How are we true to ourselves, how do we love others, and how do we act in the world?


Prerequisites
Interest in philosophy

H2072: Counting Votes
Difficulty: **

One man, one vote may be the law of the land in America, but it isn't always like that. Learn about the different ways democracies can count votes in elections, and how this affects who wins. Learn how politicians strategize based upon how people can vote.


Prerequisites
As long as you know how to add and multiply, and think presidential elections are kind of cool!

H2022: Is School Failing You?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joseph Tomchak

Educational issues are common political topics from local to state elections, but it often misses the fact that real students suffer consequences of bad policies and failing school. This class will examine some of the issues of educational policy, best practices, and personal experiences. Class will end with a simulation of creating school policy under realistic conditions.

H1957: Intro to France and French Conversation
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Peter Wyckoff

This course is designed to give you a very basic grasp of French conversation and France. The main goal is to equip the student with the basic tools one would need when going to France.
The first part of class, we will discuss basic points of French conversation, from Hello/Thank you, to "Where is x?" through games and mutlimedia.
The second part of the class will give a brief introduction to France and Paris with bits of songs, movies and lots of pictures.

H1996: Activism, the United States, and you!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trinh Truong

Virtually every major change in the United States involved American citizens working together to campaign for what they believed in. Activism has been an important, if not the most important, driving force for social and political change in the United States. This course will explore the role of activism behind major moments in United States history like the American Revolution, the Civil Rights Movement, and the modern day education reform movement. It will also explore the different forms of activism and how people today can take part in it. If you are looking to discover the importance of activism, or are interested in becoming an activist, this class is where you belong!

H1956: Shadows
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Spencer Rogers

In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato considers prisoners who, from childhood, spend their lives gazing upon mere shadows of the real. He was pointing to a real condition of humanity, and difficulties inherent in the propagation and possession of knowledge. We'll talk first about the allegory, and then move on to discuss a variety of related topics drawn from philosophy, physics, fiction, and everyday experience.

H2082: Rhetoric: Body and Mind
Difficulty: **

Ever hear a person say something that sounded right, but really wasn't? Ever see someone speak that you couldn't take your eyes off of? Ever notice how combining anaphora and rhetorical questions can make for a great introduction? In this class we'll look at body language and the use of rhetoric to gain a glance into how can clarify and obscure, help and jeopardize, and convey honesty while secretly subverting truth.

H2071: The Buckley Program: The Life of William F. Buckley, Jr.
Difficulty: *

A survey of the life, work, and teachings of William F Buckley, Jr.


Prerequisites
None

H1966: Let the money work for you - Financial Literacy in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis
Difficulty: **

The hubris of spurious precision, complexity, systemic risks and many other factors and phenomena contributed to the global financial crisis of 2007-09. Lessons learned highlighted the need to reconsider the scope and nature of financial literacy initiatives and programs. We study how modern financial markets work, we learn about their peculiarities and discuss how we can thrive in light of the immense challenges that turbulent, dynamic and complex systems pose.


Prerequisites
Curiosity and an open mind

H2078: Can computers think? Full!
Difficulty: **

This course serves as a brief foray into the philosophy of artificial intelligence, where we ask the question “can a computer ever think?” To this end, we will discuss the “Turing Test” to ascertain the intelligence of a machine, its inadequacies as exposed by John Searle’s Chinese Room argument, and whether the notion of computers “thinking” is itself confused.


Prerequisites
No formal background in philosophy or artificial intelligence is presupposed.

H1943: Philosophy in the News
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Evan Linn

Maybe you thought philosophy and the sorts of thinking it requires were totally irrelevant to modern life. But no! Philosophy is all around us – you just have to know where to look. We'll be doing some of that looking in this class. I'll bring a few recent news stories – feel free to bring some of your own! – and we'll discuss them from a philosophical perspective. Along the way, you'll learn some basic tools of the philosophical trade, like how to reconstruct arguments and assess them.


Prerequisites
interest in what's going on in the world, and a willingness to think hard

H2090: The Buckley Program: The French Revolution Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: william strench

Besides guillotines and Les Miserables, what do you know about the revolution in France that shocked Europe only a few years after our own revolution changed North America forever. This class will be an extremely brief overview of the story of the French revolution of 1789 and its impact then and now.

H1963: Introduction to Poetry
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Logan Zelk

Poetry is a human tradition that goes back to our roots, thousands of years. It is visible in every civilization with a written language, and has defined much of our culture. Discuss what poetry is for, what makes good poetry, and how we craft poetry.


Prerequisites
Comfort with writing and reading poetry in class.

H1999: The Fall of North Korea Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Madeleine Lee

It is the 21st century, and yet North Korea, a reclusive totalitarian regime and notorious human rights abuser, is heading into its 68th year of existence.

In an era marked by growing democracy, humanitarian advocacy, and free-flowing information, can North Korea continue to persist? Or is it destined to fail?

"The Fall of North Korea" will explore the dark political reality of the world's most secretive state; the quiet capitalist revolution currently pervading North Korean society; the arguments for and against the reunification of the two Korea's; and our place amidst this all.


Prerequisites
No background necessary, besides an eagerness to learn about international affairs. This is an issue that everyone should be familiar with.

H1965: (How) Can We Really Be Sure That The Sun Will Rise Tomorrow? – Understanding Problems of Induction and an Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
Difficulty: *

My course provides a basic introduction to the main philosophical questions and issues concerning epistemology, scientific knowledge and methodology. It puts an emphasis on different problems of induction, including the so-called old (David Hume) and new (Nelson Goodman) riddle of induction. Commonly, induction is a method of reasoning in which a generalization is argued to be true based on individual examples that seem to fit with that generalization. For example, after observing that the sun rose yesterday and the day before yesterday etc., one might inductively infer that the sun rises every day. Problems of induction are particularly suited to catch students’ interest because it probably makes them wonder about elements of our knowledge which are all too often taken for granted. They learn to challenge unquestioned ‘truths’, which not only teaches us in the art of reflection – what can philosophical reflection on the history of science tell us about the reliability of scientific methodology? –, but might also have a sustainable impact on their academic interests and careers.


Prerequisites
Interest in what's going on in the world, and a willingness to think hard

H1967: John Steinbeck in Perspective Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Katie Stoops

We'll take a look at how the works of John Steinbeck, a Nobel laureate and classic American author from Salinas, CA, reflected the issues of his time. Specifically, we'll see his responses and references to the Great Depression, antisemitism of the 1930s and 1940s, Germany's propaganda in Mexico pre WWII, the Manhattan project, feminism in the 1950s and 1960s. Through this course, you'll get to see how literature can inspire global change. Keeping in mind that much of Steinbeck's world-altering work was inspired by his home in a rural and relatively unknown region of California, we'll do some of our own writing about our homes!


Prerequisites
Participants of the course should have an interest, to some degree, in creative writing.

H1994: The Message
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Laurence Li

An entire class on Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five's classic song The Message. The song's history, impact, significance, and just straight-up dopeness will all be discussed. There will be a special focus on the last verse of the song, arguably the best song in all of hip-hop.

H2019: The Rwandan Genocide: Root Causes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sheila Qasemi

The goal of the course is to give an overview of the facts of the Rwandan Genocide and delve deeper into the root causes of the Genocide. We will discuss the Hutu vs. Tutsi conflict and its role in the Genocide. We will look at the primary accounts of genocide through interviews with Hutus and Tutsis, and we will also discuss the UN and the West's response to the Genocide.

H2049: Seeing Syria: Understanding the Current Conflict
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Ishrat Mannan

Teaching students the history, context, and outcomes of the Syrian conflict and the refugee crises.


Math & Computer Science

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M2018: Beauty in Math
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mojique Tyler

Have you ever wondered why math seems so formulaic in school? Do you think that being a mathematician means applying the quadratic formula all day?

In actuality, math is a creative subject, based around the acquisition of knowledge, rather than the application of formulas. While it may seem far off and complicated, some of the most important problems don't require that much theory to comprehend and have fun with. Come and learn about some important, simple proofs to seemingly complicated problems, and the techniques behind them.


Prerequisites
Algebra is necessary, trig will be extremely useful, and some calculus would be good. While none of the concepts will be too difficult, this course will move fast.

M2038: What is a computer, but actually? Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Dani Dickstein

What is going on in this magic box you use all day? How do computers actually work? We're going to pull back the curtain of mystery a bit and take a look at what your computer is actually doing. This will be a very broad overview, so no prior experience is expected.

M1997: Cryptology: How to make and break secret codes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kirsten Knecht

In this interactive workshop, students will learn the art of creating secret codes and solving them. First, we'll explore simple codes that we can work out with pencil and paper. Then, we'll learn about the complex encryption algorithms that protect the our personal information on your mobile devices.

M1926: Nimbers (Not Numbers)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

Nimbers are a powerful tool which can reduce some simple games of strategy to mere calculating with a funny system of "numbers" called nimbers. We will talk about the winning strategy for the game of picking stones (Nim) and other simple games.

M1938: The Wallpaper Groups
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

Wallpapers are full of symmetries - ranging from simple tiled patterns to highly symmetrical designs. We will explore the interesting mathematics arising from the symmetries and play around with designing our own symmetrical patterns.

M2085: Introduction to Limits Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kuan Jiang

In this class, we will learn what a limit is, why they're useful, and how to solve one. We will look at limits of varying difficulty and use advanced algebraic skills to figure the tough ones out. This class is intended for students who have had no prior experience in calculus.


Prerequisites
Algebra II or Pre-calculus (or equivalent)

M1982: A Mad Tea Party Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rachel Lawrence

Join us for tea and cookies, accompanied by brain-bending logic puzzles inspired by the works of Lewis Carroll. We will draw heavily on puzzles from the book "Alice in Puzzle-Land" by Raymond Smullyan, with some of my own favorites thrown in. Bring your best brainteasers to share, and you'll leave with enough perplexing puzzles to frustrate you for the rest of the week!


Prerequisites
A love of math, a love of tea, or both.

M2041: To Infinity and Beyond!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Daniel Hwang

How big is infinity? What is beyond infinity? How can you work with infinity?

We’ll be discussing different levels of infinitude, creating elegant proofs, and solving riddles with infinity to note some of the most interesting properties of infinitude.


Prerequisites
Basic Algebra

M1949: Rubik's Cube, combinatorics and polyhedra Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anna Evtushenko

We will look at basic concepts of combinatorics and their application, explore Platonic solids and learn to solve the coolest puzzle of the last 25 years, the Rubik's cube.


Prerequisites
understanding of regular polygons and basic equations

M2011: Bulgarian Solitaire
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Emil Ohman

Bulgarian Solitaire is a simple game with beautiful mathematical properties. We will begin by just exploring it, and then try to explain what we observe. The rules are simple enough to explain to a six year old, but there are still questions about the game no mathematician has ever been able to figure out. Come learn about the beauty of mathematics! And maybe some partition theory.

M2055: The Price of Anarchy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jeffrey Lai

People act in selfish ways, and most of the time we should not fault them for this. However there are many situations when selfish behavior is detrimental to the group as a whole. Instead of trying to force people to not be selfish, this class explores the alternative: designing systems so that selfish behavior is benign.

We will draw from many real world examples to demonstrate how systems can fail catastrophically and discuss what we can do to fix these problems.


Prerequisites
We will be applying some basic algebra, game theory, and graph theory. The game theory and graph theory will be explained however and should not be too difficult.

M1935: "Easy" Unsolved Problems In Mathematics Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

In this class, we will look at a number of famous unsolved problems in mathematics which are easy to state but (apparently) hard to prove. The problems will come from a variety of fields of mathematics including number theory, geometry, and combinatorics.

M1988: Structure of the Internet
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alex Reinking

When you visit a website, what is actually happening? Learn about how websites are created, what goes on in the background, and how they ultimately end up on your computer.

M1939: Abstract Algebra: Questions Teachers Refused to Answer in High School
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Saydjari

Why can’t I divide by zero? Why can’t I cancel “x” from both sides of a polynomial equation. Why can’t I have more than two operations (addition/subtraction, multiplication/division) on a set? Frequently, these questions are dismissed in early math classes. However, the answer most certainly is not: “It just is that way.” This course will give an introduction to the fundamental structures that underlie all of math and answer some of these simple, but deep questions. While not comparable to a full semester course in abstract algebra, expect to gain a working familiarity with extremely powerful concepts. Examples and applications will be accessible to all levels of prior math experience.

Key Words: Group, Ring, Vector Space, Module, Field, Algebra


Prerequisites
None; Knowing how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide in the integers is all that is necessary. Knowing what a vector is may be helpful, but will not be essential to the bulk of the material.

M1995: Intro to Wordpress: Making Your Own Website
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lauren Ribordy

Making a website has never been easier than today with the Wordpress engine. A large number of websites today are powered through Wordpress, and you don't even need to know how to code! Learn how to use your new website to keep your own blog, present your resume, and do anything you like!


Science

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S2029: A New World Imagined
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Annie Bui

Imagine a world transitioned away from dirty fossil fuels. Imagine our world run on renewable energy. Renewable energy is generally defined as energy that is collected from resources which are naturally replenished on a human timescale, such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves, and geothermal heat. Renewable energy often provides energy in four important areas: electricity generation, air and water heating/cooling, transportation, and rural (off-grid) energy services

S2024: Paleoenvironments: Chemistry and the Earth System
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rain Tsong

Paleoenvironment: "paleo" + "environment", i.e. the ancient environment, or what the world looked like several thousands, millions, or billions of years ago. By using the principles of chemistry to our examination of the planet, we can learn a lot about how the Earth has functioned in the past, how it has evolved over time, and how it may change in the future.


Prerequisites
Any basic chemistry class (honors, AP, other). An earth science class will be useful!

S1927: Why Play Nice?: Cooperation in Evolution
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

"Survival of the fittest" suggests that evolution is a fight, each organism vying for its own survival. Yet, in nature, we observe organisms cooperating and even making sacrifices for one another. Learn how evolution encourages cooperative behavior by playing simple games and using the lens of games to shed light on this peculiar aspect of evolution.

S1930: Introduction to Nucleic Acid Structure
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Peter Wang

DNAs are generally described as double helices from four possible nucleotides-- A, T, C, and G. In this class, we will delve deeper into the structure of this family of some of the most charismatic bio-macromolecules known, and explore the fascinating world of nucleic acid structures. We will explore the subtle structure and chemical properties of DNAs and RNAs, and also discuss other types of nucleic acids including xeno nucleic acids (XNAs) and other chemically modified nucleic acids.


Prerequisites
Basic background biology knowledge of DNAs and RNAs

S1913: Physics of Gravitational Waves and Black Holes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: benjamin horowitz

On a basic level, gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space caused by movement of bodies with mass. In this class we will dive deeper into the math behind gravitational waves and the recent signal detected by LIGO of a black hole merger. Along the way, we will explore some of the physics of black holes themselves and discuss why they are of such interest to physicists.

This course will be rather math heavy! Students who are more interested in a more conceptual course should take my "Gravitational Waves, LIGO, and the Future of Cosmology" course. There will be overlap between the courses so I don't recommend enrollment in both.


Prerequisites
Algebra, familiarity with vectors, and trigonometry are required! Basic physics knowledge would also be helpful.

S1947: 100 Years of Mars
Difficulty: **

Got Curiosity? Then you already have a lot in common with the Red Planet! 50 years in, investigate and extrapolate the first century of our interaction with Mars. From Mariner to the Martian, we'll explore the legacy of robotic pioneers and examine NASA proposals for eventual human missions to Mars.

S2045: GMOs: Friend or Foe?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Greg Suralik

There's a lot of discussion about genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, entering the American food supply. But what exactly is a GMO, and are they dangerous? Should they be labeled on food packaging? These are the questions we'll discuss in the lecture.

S2070: Symbiosis and the Microbiome
Difficulty: *

If you've ever had a cold or the flu, you know firsthand that microbes can make you sick. But did you know that you have trillions of harmless bacteria living inside you right now? This collection is known as the "microbiome" and it plays important roles in digestion, helping our immune systems develop, and fending off invading pathogens.

We'll talk about symbiotic microbes in nature - like the glowing bacterium Vibrio fischeri that lives inside a Hawaiian squid. Then we'll take a look at our own microbes and learn how we study them in the lab.

For more focus on human microbes take "Healthy Bacteria" with Tyler!

S2014: Optical Illusions and the Brain
Difficulty: **

Ever wondered why optical illusions exist? In this class, we will look at a variety of examples and explain how they work. We will discuss visual perception and how the eye is able to create a 3D interpretation of the world from only a 2D image and why we attend to certain things and not others.

Optical Illusions and the Brain - Visual Cognition and Perception

S2069: Healthy Bacteria
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tyler Rice

Although some bacteria can cause infections and make people sick, recent studies have taught us that trillions of bacteria living inside of us may be responsible for keeping us healthy! Come learn about these health-promoting commensal bacteria and how we might use them in the future as a new type of medicine.


Prerequisites
Biology recommended

S1976: Brain Busters
Difficulty: ***

We are cracking open the noggin to learn more about neural pathophysiology, specifically we will be discussing the bacterial and viral infections that can disturb neural function and how they can cause disease. We will also tackle prions and protein-based neurodegenerative diseases.
This course is brought to you by an avid microbiologist and specialist in neurodegeneration. Both undergraduate seniors actively involved with research on campus.


Prerequisites
Having had coursework in biology will be helpful in this course.

S1998: This Is Your Brain On Drugs
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Danielle Currin

Do you drink coffee? How about tea? Have you ever taken a Tylenol for a headache? Then you (yes, you) have taken drugs. Drugs are such a big part of our society, but how do they actually work? We'll discuss the basic biology of neurotransmitters and receptors in the brain, and then we'll talk about how different kinds of drugs (focusing on alcohol and caffeine) can affect both your brain and your body.


Prerequisites
Some basic knowledge of biology may be helpful, but isn't required.

S2083: Cell Biology: Introduction to Organelles Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kuan Jiang

What makes up what we're made up of? This course will focus on different kinds of organelles and their jobs within our cells.

S1945: Reading the Bones Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan France

Skeletons aren't just dry bones. To anthropologists and forensic scientists, they're valuable clues. In this class, we'll learn how to determine the age, sex, heritage, diet, health, species and lifestyle of the dead -- all from bones alone. We'll look at skeletons from an anthropological perspective, focusing on what they tell us about human evolution, and from a forensic perspective, focusing on what they tell us about crime. The next time you visit a museum, you'll know all about the bones on display before even looking at the labels.


Prerequisites
None

S1917: Microbiology Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ryan Malpass

Bacteria were the first life forms to appear nearly 3.8 billion years ago, and today can be found in hot, acidic hydrothermal vents and Arctic lakes. Tiny cells without a nucleus or membrane-bound organelles, bacteria are the most thriving and abundant form of life on Earth. The human body harbors ten times the number of bacteria compared to cells, while bacteria have formed both symbiotic and parasitic relationships with plants and animals. Most bacteria in your body are neutral or beneficial, although many diseases are caused by pathogenic infection. Much of the biochemistry, protein structure and function in bacteria is well-defined, and important discoveries have been made using model systems such as E. Coli. Bacteria have been used in the beer and bread industries for thousands of years, and now biotechnology uses bacteria to manufacture proteins such as human insulin. Bacteria are amazing, efficient machines that occupy many diverse niches. Plus, some bacteria have unique functions such as bioluminescence (they glow in the dark!)


Prerequisites
None, though biology may be helpful

S2074: Cloning: Jurassic Park to Now
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mac Crite

In the Jurassic Park movies, dinosaurs are cloned from blood found in a mosquito. How realistic is the movie? How accurate is the science behind it?

This course will explore the legitimacy of Jurassic Park and discuss modern cloning techniques. Short clips of the movie may be used!


Prerequisites
General background in biological concepts and knowledge of DNA. Watching Jurassic Park isn't necessary but would be helpful!

S2005: The Euler-Lagrange Equations
Difficulty: ***

If you've taken any high school physics, you're probably familiar with Newton's laws. What if we told you there was another formulation thereof, called the Lagrangian, that lets you solve many problems that are nearly impossible with just the Newtonian formulation? In this class, we will explore the derivation of the Lagrangian formulation from the Euler-Lagrange equations, then solve a few examples to demonstrate the elegance of this new formulation.


Prerequisites
calculus

S2086: Total Recall: How Immunological Memory Helps Us Fight Diseases
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wondered how exactly vaccines work? Or why it's said that you can't catch the same cold twice? In this class we will discuss how the specialized cells of the adaptive immune system manage to recognize the wide range of bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can threaten our health, and then how our cells form memory to be more effective at fighting them off in the future.


Prerequisites
Some background in biology is recommended!

S1916: The Future of American Health Care
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Xiao

The United States spends more on health care than any other country in the world does. Increasing costs of care raise a host of questions surrounding our health system. But much of this uncertainty stems from one harsh fact: most people have no idea how the health care system works or what it will look like in the future. This course will explain how health care in the United States actually works and how the various players involved are evolving as we speak. A great way to learn about an issue that is (literally) a matter of life and death!

S1977: Interesting Case Studies in Neuroscience Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vicky Chou

Every day scientists are discovering more and more about our most powerful muscle: the brain!

Throughout this course, various significant course studies in the field of neuroscience will be discussed, with the occasional optical illusions.

Be prepared to boggle your brain.


Prerequisites
None!

S1958: Disease Detectives 101: Investigation of an Outbreak
Difficulty: **

Ever wondered how disease outbreaks like Ebola, Zika, and Listeria are identified and controlled? In this course you'll become a disease detective while learning about the processes involved in an outbreak investigation.

S2079: Chemical Reactions
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Andrew Brod

Through a series of demonstrations, we will explore the foundations of chemistry. There will be fire.

S2023: Measuring the Skies
Difficulty: **

Have you ever seen the sky at night? (If not, please do it tonight)
Ever wanted to tell your friends from other cities to look at a star, but couldn't do it without pointing at it? This is the class for you! Learn how to determine coordinates of stars on the sky, measure angles between different stars and even convert coordinates between places and dates!


Prerequisites
Basic Trigonometry

S2048: Energy from Topology: Math Meets Materials Meets the Real World
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Grace Pan

As people study deeper and deeper math, they encounter beautiful but arcane concepts that usually only mathematicians might appreciate.

But sometimes beautiful math manifests itself in the physical world, in the nanoscale world. And this beautiful math has huge implications for what physics we see. Sometimes, it even suggests new paradigms of energy control and computing.

This class will be a brief introduction to the world of "topological materials", where physics, math, and the real world all converge at once.


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of high school physics and math concepts. There will be very few, if any, equations.

S1960: What makes a dinosaur a dinosaur? Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Adrien Gau

Dinosaurs are really cool. There are a lot of other prehistoric creatures that are also really cool, however, and thus people mix dinosaurs and non-dinosaurs up all the time. We've also made a lot of new discoveries about dinosaurs that haven't seemed to reach pop culture yet, Jurassic World being a prime, disappointing example. So if you're interested in finding out what really makes a dinosaur a dinosaur, well, I guess this is the class for you. Bring all and any dinosaur questions you might've had since you were 5, as well as a willingness to accept the fact that T. rex probably had feathers. You wouldn't believe the amount of literature--and public stubbornness--that attempts to disprove the idea of feathered dinosaurs.


Prerequisites
would be useful to know what a phylogenetic tree is.

S2066: World Health Organization: Talking about Global Health

Learn about the WHO and important global health issues! How do you talk and write about issues like vaccines, diseases and clean water? Learn about these issues and how to talk about them with this course.

S2004: Selling Nutrition: What Food Labels Actually Mean
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Suzanne Xu

Natural! Full of Antioxidants! Fat-Free! Do these labels seem familiar? Many food manufacturers use these terms to draw us in and get us to purchase their product, but what do these words actually mean? In this class, we will be going over the scientific meanings of commonly-seen terms and the FDA/USDA regulation of their usage (or lack-there-of).


Prerequisites
Your interest in the subject! (We will touch on basic chemistry and biology, but nothing that requires a background in those areas)

S1915: Gravitational Waves, LIGO, and the Future of Cosmology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: benjamin horowitz

The recent discovery of a gravitational wave signal from a binary black hole merger has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the universe. In this course we will discuss the basics of General Relativity (the mathematics behind gravitational waves), the astrophysics behind their production, and a bit about the experimental design of their detection.

This course will be primarily qualitative; students who are more interested in an advanced description should take "Physics of Gravitational Waves and Black Holes". There will be overlap between the courses so I don't recommend enrollment in both.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of basic algebra and trigonometry would be helpful.

S2047: Penguins!
Difficulty: *

Everyone loves penguins, but how much do you know about them? This course will cover the essentials of these fascinating birds, including geographic distribution, anatomy, feeding, and reproduction. Get ready to excite the inner ornithologist in you!

S2025: Deforming Spacetime? Metrics in General Relativity
Difficulty: **

Does hearing "General Relativity" excite you? Ever wondered why it is so different from Special Relativity? Or how masses can deform the spacetime continuum? If yes, then this is the course for you!

I will be introducing the concept of metric, and using it to describe the shape of spacetime in a few special cases (flat space; black hole,...)

If interested in continuing the analysis of GR and understanding, say Gravitational Waves (!!!) take the other Splash courses on LIGO and Gravitational Waves! The courses on LIGO offer completely different approaches to the topic than this course, so I'd recommend all of them.


Prerequisites
Basic Derivatives (like speed = derivative of space)

S2068: Fantastic Beasts and How to Sort Them
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Molly Mullen

Come find out how phylogenetic trees work and why evolutionary biologists use them. Then, test out your phylogeny skills on a crazy collection of imaginary creatures!
Intended for students who have little to no experience with phylogeny.


Prerequisites
Be ready to draw! Bad artists welcome.

S2054: The Origins of Life Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Grace Johnson

In this class we will discuss the amazing feat of the formation of life on earth. How did the first chemical building blocks of life form? How were those building blocks organized into cells? How did single cells evolve in complex organisms? And if life formed on earth, how likely is it that it exists on other planets?

S2056: The Physics of Protein Folding
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Curran Oi

Protein folding, the process of a sequence of amino acids forming a more ordered protein structure, is a fundamental problem in biology. Proteins are involved in almost every biological process and correct folding of proteins is critical to proper cellular function. Among other questions, this class will explore how proteins fold, how their folding can be understood in terms of basic physics principles, and how physics modeling techniques have been used to simplify the protein folding problem.


Prerequisites
Algebra, biology, and physics strongly recommended.

S1946: History of the Universe : Big Bang - Present
Difficulty: **

What better place to start than the beginning? Of time, that is. This course will piece together the eras of cosmic history, taking special note of the advances in astronomy, elementary particle physics, and nuclear physics that built our current knowledge of the exciting first billion years of cosmic existence.

S2016: Aliens?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jack Hilder

Is there life beyond Earth? The question may seem like it belongs only in science fiction movies, but by using principles of Astronomy, Geology, and Biology, we can actually make a fairly educated guess whether or not we're sharing the Universe. Take this class to learn how.

S2064: Organometallic Chemistry and the modern science paper
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: David Minoli

Look at your shoes. The polymers in the soles were made with organometallic catalysts. Look at your hand, alive because of nitrogen fixed by bacteria capable of harnessing the tremendous energy of atmospheric N2. Look at your phone, or even this computer screen, and gaze upon millions of LEDs, all made using an organometallic vapor deposition technique! Our society would not exist were it not for organometallic chemistry.

Organometallic chemistry is the chemistry of transition metals interacting with carbon, and is one of the most active frontiers of modern chemistry. Without overwhelming anyone, this class should provide you with a taste of the vast world of current organometallic chemical research.

Class will focus around the work of two Yale professors, Robert Crabtree and Patrick Holland, and will include a paper to be read before class, so we can dedicate fifteen-twenty minutes to the discussion of its contents and ramifications.

This class is for you guys, so if there's a subject you'd like to cover please let me know at david.minoli@yale.edu and I'll work it in if it's relevant.


Prerequisites
High school chemistry, completion or current enrollment in AP chemistry (or equivalent) preferred. If you're super curious about the class but feel worried that you don't have the prerequisite knowledge, feel free to contact me at david.minoli@yale.edu and I can help you find the materials needed to get up to speed. I will be assigning a short (3-4 page) paper to read a few days before class.

S2003: Sustainability in Science
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nasim Mirzajani

Focus on the 12 principles of green chemistry, what they mean and how they apply to the practice of synthesis and design.


Prerequisites
Rudimentary understanding of Chemistry and enthusiasm for sustainability.

S2062: Phylogenetics: The Evolutionary History of Fishes
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wondered how scientists understand the evolutionary history of living species? In this class, we will use phylogenetics to determine the relationships among different species of fish. By studying specimens from the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, students will be able to reconstruct the fish tree of life.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with basic Biology/Life Sciences

S2031: Autism Spectrum Disorder 101 Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Stella Kyprianou

We will discuss, what is Autism Spectrum Disorder, talk about the common characteristics usually associated with ASD, the diagnosis process, the possible causes and discuss the various interventions that are commonly used.

S1978: Sound? Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Xinyuan Chen

Waves are everywhere. In this lecture I'll be going over some basics of one way we make use of waves- in sound and sound production. We'll go over what sound is, how it travels, and how to manipulate it with a focus towards electronic music!

S1984: Enzymes in Action: Chemistry and Demonstrations of Biological Machines
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Koronkiewicz

Are you alive? Are you interested in why that is so? Budding biologists and chemists unite! This class will cover the amazing world of chemical reactions catalyzed by proteins. Thorough but brief, we will focus on a few accessible examples of enzymes and the theory of how they work . The entire class will be supplemented by demonstrations which will allow students to learn an interesting characteristic of enzyme catalysis. These lessons will be further supported through useful discussion and helpful, custom-tailored images of structure-function relationships in enzyme catalysis. Material is applicable to fields of chemistry, biology, and medicine.


Prerequisites
Some exposure to biology and chemistry. Willingness to share thoughts and observations.

S1991: Introduction to Social Psychology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ayotunde Ifaturoti

Why do we stereotype others and how (if possible) can we stop? How are you shaped by the people, friends, and authority figures around you? Are you actually in control of your actions, or are you merely subject to the social norms that society enforces? Why we fall in love? What would you do to follow the rules? I hope to tackle all these and more in a super fun and engaging romp through the theories and seminal studies of social psychology!!!

S1959: Cosmology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: benjamin horowitz

Why is the universe expanding? What is cosmological inflation? What creates the structure we see in the universe today? Come to learn all about the history of the universe and some of the still open questions!


Prerequisites
Knowledge of algebra is crucial. Some background physics knowledge would be helpful but isn't required.

S1973: The Biology of Trees
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Heidi VanderWel

brief description on the basic make up of a tree and how it works along with how the different types of wood are used to make things

S2039: The Chemistry of Perfume
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mindy Le

This course focuses on the science of perfume-making, including: the chemistry of fragrance, odor perception, perfume types, and the process of making perfume.


Prerequisites
very basic knowledge of biochemistry


Miscellaneous

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X2093: The Buckley Program: The Civic Projects of New Haven
Difficulty: **
Teachers: mubarak olukotun

This is a course that will look at potential civic projects students could complete to help the city of New Haven. It explores what the people of New Haven would most benefit from and how to do this.

X1940: Speed Stacking for Beginners
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Danielle Currin

A fun, interactive introduction to the methods behind the art of cup stacking. Never heard of cup stacking before? Check out this video -- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sa9cXHGZHc -- for a preview of what we'll be practicing in class. All levels of expertise are welcome, but this class will be geared towards those with minimal experience.

X1989: Positivity: The Power of Optimism
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Caitlin Dermody

Come see the sunny side of life!


Prerequisites
n/a

X2044: The History of Video Games
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Greg Suralik

Before there was the Legend of Zelda, the Xbox One, and Angry Birds, there was the game of Pong, the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the Game & Watch series. How did one computer program spawn a multi-billion dollar global industry that has become a cornerstone of entertainment? This course hopes to find out.


Prerequisites
Nothing besides a willingness to learn!

X2080: Origami!
Difficulty: **

What do stars, bouquets of flowers, cranes, and boxes all have in common? (Hint: see class title.) Come fold cool (possibly modular!) origami, and impress your friends with your new creations!

X2042: Being A Princess: A Look Into Disney
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Daniel Hwang

Being a princess is tough work. Sometimes. In this class, we will critically analyze how Disney princesses are portrayed, their interactions with other characters, their strengths, and their faults, as well as look at the princesses in the context of the Disney empire and time period. Come prepared to rethink how you feel about some of the most iconic animated films.


Prerequisites
Willingness to look past nostalgia Familiarity with at least one Disney princess

X2081: Vámanos on the Way of St. James
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jessica Wu

What is a pilgrimage? Why have people walked across Spain since the 11th century? We will journey toward the Cathedral at Santiago de Compostela and learn about the history behind the Way of St. James. You'll also have the opportunity to start planning your own journey!


Prerequisites
N/A

X1993: Trump and Bernie: Radical or Extremist?
Difficulty: **

What does it mean to be extreme and radical? Can you be one without the other or are the terms the same? Class will examine these questions through the lens of the presidential primary. It will end with deciding if quotes are extreme or not. Do you secretly support some of Trump's statements or find popular figures radical?


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of Trump, Bernie, or other current presidential candidate.

X2033: From Stage to Screen and Back Again
Difficulty: *

Why was Spider-Man a box office hit and a colossal Broadway failure? Can Les Miserables do any wrong? Will we ever see Hamilton: The Film? This course asks what makes films and plays distinct forms of entertainment, looking at notable examples of successful films and plays from the past decade as well as works that have had success both on the stage and on the screen. We will look at all of the films and plays mentioned above, as well as Rocky, Much Ado About Nothing, Mad Max: Fury Road, Slumdog Millionaire, and The Book of Mormon.

X2020: Finding Yourself and Interests
Difficulty: *

A course centered around finding your interests and what YOU like outside of what your parents, friends and family (even yourself) think you should do. How to find what you want, your calling and how to turn your ideas into reality.

X1920: Problems with American Politics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Xiao

The phrase "the American political system is broken" is probably spoken a million times a day. But why is our democracy broken, and how has it failed us? Hint: it's mostly our own fault.

This class will explore how the founding fathers, the American people, and the modern day politicians, are all to blame for why our particular brand of representative government is becoming more ineffective by the day. Learn about how some of the basic U.S. history facts that we have all learned are actually the main reasons why American politics has become a cesspool of inefficiency, inactivity and discrimination.

X1933: Aliens of the Deep: Cephalopods
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

The molluscan class of cephalopods includes some of nature's strangest and most interesting organisms. Come along as we learn about the cuttlefish, octopus, nautilus, and squid through science, literature, and film. In addition to the course material, you will have a chance to dissect a squid, explicate great poetry, and enjoy classic movies. No background in any of these fields is required.

X2015: Design thinking and Ideation Workshop Full!
Difficulty: **

In this hands-on workshop we will explore design thinking and the design process. We'll learn about the history and philosophy of design, then break into teams to confront a real-world challenge.

X2057: Intersectional feminist poet/activists
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Angelica Perez

Intersectionality is a concept often used in critical theories to describe the ways in which oppressive institutions (racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, xenophobia, classism, etc.) are interconnected and cannot be examined separately from one another.We will be discussing some famous intersectional activist poets.


Prerequisites
none

X2058: Engineering the Absurd: Strange Millitary Vehicle Designs, Interwar to Cold War
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nathaniel Stanford

Have you ever heard of the A-40 Flying Tank? How about the Lun Ekranoplan? In this class, we'll explore the most ridiculous vehicle designs ever produced as serious military efforts.


Prerequisites
Interest in WWII

X2063: Spanish 1 Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Adriana Gradilla

Teaching Spanish to non-Spanish speakers.


Prerequisites
Be ready to participate

X1968: Home Is Where the Heart Is. On Becoming International Student (and Exploring the World)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vanda Cernohorska

Have you ever dreamt about exploring the world? Come join me, an international student from Europe, as we will talk about the many advantages (but also challenges!) of packing your suitcase and setting out on an adventure of your life.

X2076: Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Pretzels Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Hannah Lawrence

Try your hand at logic puzzles, mathematical paradoxes, lateral thinking problems, and everything in between! While you’re at it, nosh on some pretzels, which will be supplemented with Nutella and various other pretzel-friendly snacks.

X2088: Getting the Internship
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Aiyana Bobrownicki

In this class, we'll discuss how to find internships, prepare for professional opportunities, and create resumes and cover letters that make you stand out. This will be a fast paced interactive workshop, so come prepared to draft and revise application materials with your peers!


Prerequisites
To participate in this class you will need to arrive with 1) a list of your past experiences to use when creating a resume 2) a short list of fields or jobs you might want to experience as an intern.

X2034: Netflix and Disrupt the Consumption of Media?
Difficulty: *

There's nothing chill about Netflix; what started as a service that delivered DVDs to your door has completely revolutionized the way we consume entertainment. From pricing to content to the ways you can watch, Netflix has forced cable providers and networks to scramble and innovate at an unprecedented speed in order to avoid losing their customer base. In the course of an hour, I hope to convince you that Netflix has had a bigger impact on the media industry than the introduction of cable television. TV shows and programs studied include Master of None, Mad Men, Mr. Robot, Black-ish, The Colbert Report, and John Mulaney: The Comeback Kid.

X2059: Air Navigation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Slawomir Wojcik

How would you find your way in the air when flying an airplane? What instruments pilots use to determine their position in space (often at night or surrounded by clouds) and direction to their destination?
We will discuss a few different methods of navigation in the air (from very simple to the most advanced ones) as well as mathematical/physical principles behind them.
Finally you will have a chance to test your skills in a couple of real life scenarios.

X2021: Foreign Policy
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Joseph Tomchak

An examination of some of the complex decisions policy makers face with foreign affairs. The class will teach these issues through case studies of current issues such as ISIS and North Korea. Class will end with a simulation: have you learned enough to avert a crisis?

X1924: Psychology of Happiness
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

Many teens think they'll be happy if they get into a top choice college or if they get a new phone. They assume that a bad grade, a breakup, or a broken bone will make them miserable.

However, psychologists who study happiness have learned that happiness is more like a skill that can be acquired and needs constant practice than a state of being.

In this session, we'll review some of the basics of what happiness psychologists have discovered and we'll practice some happiness-increasing techniques. We won't need a million dollars or a new smart phone: all we'll use are a paper and pen.

X1981: Chen's Incredibly Idiosyncratic Entirely Subjective Take-A-Break Come-As-You-Like Discover Your New Favorite Artist Music Playlist Jamtimes
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Xinyuan Chen

I... listen to a lot of music.

I'll basically be DJ'ing music I really like for 2 hours. No real theme, just music I like. Maybe you'll discover a new favorite tune or artist! I'll have some fun facts about each song too, but it's more just a chance to hang out. Stop by with your friends and relax. I'll have snacks! And the following board games:

1. Exploding Kittens
2. Settlers of Catan
3. Magic: The Gathering Duel Decks


Prerequisites
Do you like music? if so, drop by!

X1961: The Art of Nudging: How to Change People's Behaviors
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Adrien Gau

We all know that humans are fallible, easily-persuaded creatures. What you may not know is that we are also all Choice Architects--that is, we all, to an extent, construct the way other people make decisions and judgments. Learn how you can use this to your advantage and nudge people toward certain actions and decisions*, given a certain stimulus, circumstance, and desired outcome--and how sometimes you get the completely opposite result instead.

*I am not advocating for mind control. Never use behavioral psychology for evil!


Prerequisites
desire to use this knowledge for good (or not at all), versus for bad. :P

X2037: Explore Hawai'i
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stephanie Spear

Every culture has its own style of dance. Come join this class to learn a little bit about the hula, the dance of the Hawaiian people, and the Hawaiian culture! Aloha!


Prerequisites
Positive attitude and open mindedness!

X2002: Introduction to Linguistics
Difficulty: **

Ever wonder what exactly linguists do? Ever wanted to know the scientific name for the sound you make when you blow a raspberry? This course will answer those questions and offer a sampling of different fields in linguistics, followed by som fun logic puzzles from the International Linguistics Olympiad.

X2087: The Buckley Program: America's Constitution: What it is and why it matters
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Pranam Dey

What is the American Constitution? Why is it the Supreme Law of the Land? How did it come into existence? How has it changed over time? And above all, why should you care, and how does it affect you? Since 1787, Americans have lived under the rule of the Constitution and have fought and died defending it. The Constitution has shaped the course of American and even world history, and other nations have based their own constitutions on our model. During these 50 minutes, let's go over the origins and structure of the Constitution, then cover how it shaped our history and continues to guide us today and into the future.

X1919: The Psychology and Biology of Eating Disorders
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jessica Schmerler

Common misconceptions about eating disorders are that they are all about losing weight, that people who have them are self-absorbed, or that the food-related behaviors are voluntary. This course will discuss the various types of eating disorders, with a specific focus on psychological and biological symptoms and treatment.

X1952: Politics of Skyrim
Difficulty: *
Teachers: William Merrill

Sure, slaying dragons while wearing quasi-Viking armor is fun, but the 2011 video game The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim been acclaimed as much for its nuanced theme of civil war as for its fantasy storyline. We will explore how Skyrim deals with political topics such as imperialism, nationalism, racism, and political economy, and conclude with a role-played debate between the Imperial and Stormcloak factions.


Prerequisites
You should probably have played Skyrim at some point (deep mastery of the lore is neither required nor expected)

X1990: Intro to Videography Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Wayne Zhang

Interested in filming and video reporting? In this class, we'll go over basics of framing, exposing, and lighting shots, so that if you ever need to film an interview, you'll be prepared! Students will have the ability to practice their skills on cameras—PLEASE BE CAREFUL WITH RENTAL EQUIPMENT!


Prerequisites
Any previous experience with cameras would be helpful!

X2091: The Buckley Program: Federalism: Countries, States, and Cities
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Zach Young

We will discuss the roots and key understandings of political federalism, which is the division of power among vertical governments that share territory. Ever wonder why you have a Governor, not just a President? Would our society function better with only one level of government? What are the powers of the federal government and the states?

X1918: Introduction to Political Science
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Xiao

Does having a Democratic government make you richer? Is the Food and Drug Administration feeding us poisonous substances? What is so special about Lebanon's army? Questions like these fill the minds of the world's most influential decision makers everyday, because these are the questions that decide the course of history. At its core, Political Science is the study of how people interact in a world where the forces of ambition, altruism, pragmatism, and greed collide on a daily basis. How can we accurately analyze the big issues of today, and what does that tell us about, well, ourselves? Take this course and find out!

X2036: The Politics of Partisanship
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mohit Agrawal

We will delve into the political science and economics literature to understand partisanship in the US today and how it affects our elections and governance. Special focus will be placed on DW-NOMINATE and other measures of partisanship.

X2075: Public Transit in the Americas
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Sandweiss

Transportation is what moves the world, and in a world that grows more and more urban by the minute, public transit is key to developing the 21st century efficiently. In "Public Transit in the Americas," you'll learn about transportation in cities from Seattle to Santiago. You'll learn how transit systems are designed, who designs them, and what effects they have on the cities they're in-as well as designing your own transit system. You'll learn about how the world moved, moves, and will move!

X1986: Multiplexing 101 Full!
Difficulty: *

A course brought to you by the Yale Anti-Gravity Society! We'll be teaching the basic of juggling. What props to use, how to use them, and how you can get involved and continue to learn juggling. We will be providing props to juggle with and for you to practice with us. Our aim is for you to leave Splash as a certifiable multiplexer.


Prerequisites
Complete basic juggling test one. Toss and catch a ball.

X1987: Urban Inequality in Games
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Robert Scaramuccia

Rapture, Los Santos, Diamond City, The Citadel—all metropolises of unimaginable decadence and pervasive poverty. Why have so many of the past decade's greatest games used beautifully-realized cities to explore themes of economic inequality and racial hierarchy? What can virtual cities teach us about the socio-economic landscapes of Los Angeles, Detroit, or New Haven? We'll take a look at how games like Bioshock, GTA V, and Deus Ex: Human Revolution interpret what it's like to live in a diverse, interconnected space and ask whether games can accurately reflect the world we live in (spoilers: they totally can!).

X2030: Fans, Culture, and Society
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Zachary Kayal

In the modern day and age, almost everyone is a fan of something--be it a movie, a band, a book, or a celebrity--and as a result, fandoms have become hugely influential social spaces. Starting with the historical conception of the modern fans, this course will work toward an understanding of fan culture in relation to more dominant cultures and explore the material manifestations of fandoms, such as fan fiction. The course will also examine fan culture's consumerism, relationships between fans and the object of their desire, and interactions between different fans. Ultimately, the course should start students thinking critically about the role of fans in today's society: Why do individuals become fans? What powers do they hold and what powers are held over them? Where do fans fall in the social hierarchy and why?

X1942: The Art of War: Strategy and Wisdom Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aaron Segal

The Art of War is an ancient book of strategy attributed to the Chinese master general Sun Tzu. Written 2,500 years ago, it is still carried in the pockets of successful generals, executives, and politicians today. Learn how to command troops, foretell victory, avoid defeat, and become a successful general. Then test your skill in a war game!

X2007: Psychology of Body Language Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anna Mann

The majority of human communication is non-verbal and learning about the psychology of body language can help you communicate more effectively!

X2073: The American Political Parties Explained
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Zollinger

As American citizens or immigrants, it is our duty to know how our government functions and the policies of the two political parties that run our country. All too often, news and political policy is presented in ways that are difficult for people to understand. Almost entirely neglected is the education of our youngest members of our society about these topics. This class will aim to help educate middle and high schoolers about the major current events and issues affecting the US and the stances that the major political parties take on them. The class will be taught in a way that students know the important facts about issues, and they will be able to better interpret news later on. It's important to start political knowledge as early as possible so that when it's their turn to vote, our young future can make what they believe are wise selections.

X1923: Psychology of Shopping
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

What kinds of techniques do marketers use to encourage you to think you're getting a "deal"? Why do people love their Apple products but think their reliable Samsung or Sony products are just ok? We'll explore these questions and possibly more in our hour together!

X1969: Top Secret: Unethical Human Experiments of the 20th Century Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Abdallah

From illegal drug testing, to secret chemical weapons development, to psychological torture, scientific research has long been marred by unethical practices. This course will cover the details of several infamous experiments on human subjects, what made them unethical, and how that unethicality was concealed from the general public.

Note: Contains some mildly graphic content.

X2052: Mindfulness and Stress Tolerance

Learn to identify and better manage stress through mindfulness, a simple way of thinking that anyone can do.

X2000: Experiments in Psychology
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Eugine Szeto

We'll be going through a variety of interesting experiments in the field of psychology. These experiments will include concepts from social psychology and decision making. You will be participants in some of these experiments. We will also talk about why experiments might be valid.