Splash Fall 15
Course Catalog

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Arts Engineering
Humanities Math & Computer Science
Science Miscellaneous


Arts

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A1828: Why Architecture Matters
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nicolas Kemper

A look at buildings, technology, history, philosophy, aesthetics and the profession which brings them all together. A brief tour of architecture, may include a tour of some of Yale's buildings and include some model making.

A1748: Intro to Web Design Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cameron Yick

Get a top-level survey of the principles, tools, and technologies that make up the internet! No programming or design experience necessary. Come with an open mind, and you'll leave with a newfound appreciation for the techniques and tools that make the brings the modern web landscape to life.

A1824: Impromptu speaking Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Victoria Bentley

Come try out your public speaking skills in this workshop style class. We will spend some time talking about the basics of an impromptu speech, rhetoric, and persuasion. Then students will have the chance to try it out for themselves, and deliver short, "off the cuff" speeches for the class. No experience or preparation required!


Prerequisites
None!

A1781: Beatlemania
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kuan Jiang

Ladies and gentlemen... The Beatles! This course will cover a brief history of the band, starting from their humble beginnings in Liverpool to their last recording session at Trident Studios. We will also discuss key post-1970 events and their influence in today's culture. Throughout the class, we will listen to the band's recordings and analyze the evolution in their sound as they progressed. Fans and non-fans alike are welcome to take this course. Come learn about one of the greatest rock bands of all time!

A1782: The Art of Slam Poetry Full!
Difficulty: **

An introduction for students on how to write and perform slam poetry, taught by members of TEETH Slam Poets at Yale

A1757: The Basics of Improv

This class introduces the basics of how to do improv. Students will learn how to use "yes-and," character development, and active listening to create comedic improvised scenes. No experience required!

A1806: Origami Workshop
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mike Wu

A brief history in origami followed by some fun hands-on activities!


Prerequisites
None

A1779: Introduction to Ballroom Dancing Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Daniel Pham

Get on your feet and dance!
This is a crash course on Ballroom Dancing. Think Fred Astaire or, more recently, Dancing With the Stars. Dances we'll be covering: the romantic and elegant Waltz, and the energetic and flirtatious Cha-Cha.
NO DANCE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED


Engineering

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E1758: Making A Robot Full!
Difficulty: **

Want to make a robot? Interested in robotics or how robots work?

Come make a bristlebot, a small vibrating robot that can be made from an electric toothbrush, and learn about robots!

This course may require students to share tools such as scissors and tape with other students. Please sign up for this course only if you are ok with sharing (sharing is caring!).


Prerequisites
Explicitly no programming or soldering experience is required.

E1791: Biotech Innovations for Poverty Alleviation
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Yingjie Wang

The mission of technology is to develop products that alleviate human effort and suffering while enhancing life quality. Its impacts are especially great for developing countries, where infrastructure and wealth are scarce yet communicable diseases and malnutrition are prevalent. This class will go over some of the biggest breakthroughs in biotechnology and the challenges of implementing these innovations in resource poor settings.

E1772: Semiconductor Devices (i.e. how the heck do computers store 1s and 0s anyway?)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Spencer Rogers

Maybe you know something about computers. Maybe you know that they store information as 1's and 0's and run various algorithms to compute- changing strings of 1's and 0's into other strings. But do you have any idea how these 1's and 0's are stored physically? If you've ever wondered, here's your quick and dirty fix. We'll focus on the so called p-n junction, and discuss related devices like diodes and transistors as time permits.

E1768: 3D Printing the Kidney: Introduction to Tissue Engineering
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kevin Hwang

In 2011, surgeon Anthony Atala 3D-printed a rough prototype of a human kidney on-stage before a TEDx talk audience, and immediately brought forth a wave of renewed focus on 3D-printed body parts and their applications in medicine. This course will introduce the concept of tissue engineering, and the differential expression of the genetic code in forming disparate tissues. The wide variety of cell types will be addressed, as well as the associated engineering challenge of creating proper mimics of such great physiological diversity. Historical forms of tissue replacement and their strengths/flaws will be discussed, ranging from early wooden prosthetics to modern prosthetics. Surgical replacement or addition of tissues and the challenges associated with them will be presented, followed by the aspects of the tissue engineering that can address these issues. Techniques such as matrix modeling, materials engineering, and ex vivo growth and implantation will be introduced. Finally, case studies on 3D printed kidneys and artificial lungs developed at Yale will be analyzed, as well as institutional methods and debates in promoting tissue engineering research.


Prerequisites
None!


Humanities

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H1789: The Economics of Welfare
Difficulty: **

Economics - we know you're thinking banks, finance, and the cut-throat world of Wall Street. But economics is, at its core, the study of human behavior. The laws of economics play an essential role in nearly every aspect of our lives. This course will examine social welfare policy through an economic lens as we seek to understand how policy can best positively impact our communities.

H1784: The Soviet Union
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexander Jacobson

This class will offer a quick introduction to the history of the Soviet Union, a nation which existed from 1917 to 1991. We will cover the October Revolution, the construction of industry in Russia, the Second World War, the nuclear arms race, and the fall of the USSR.

H1792: Sustainability in Iceland
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jinchen Zou

This class examines sustainable energy design and implementation within larger sociocultural, economic, and environmental contexts in Iceland. In an interdisciplinary fashion, we will first examine geography and recent history of Iceland, then learn about the science behind renewable energy employed, and finally investigate implications for sustainability. We will examine case studies ranging from an eco-village to industrial areas in the East.

H1769: Language and Madness: Interpreting Pathology
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Katherine Adams

Drawing on insights from philosophy, psychoanalysis, and linguistics, we will explore the origin and form of the language of "pathological" speakers. Using literary and psychiatric case studies of neurotic and psychotic patterns of speech, we will investigate how psychological crisis embeds itself in language and will seek to uncover psychological meaning in the dialects of those deemed mad. I will provide an overview of various linguistic, psychological, and philosophical concepts that you can use as theoretical tools to develop your own interpretations of these deviant texts.

Our case studies will include writing by the poet Antonin Artaud, schizophrenic speech documented by psychologist R.D. Laing, and a mad monologue from a Shakespearian tragedy.


Prerequisites
Interest in philosophy and/or psychology

H1763: Faith in Poetry
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

As the title suggests, this class is about two subjects: faith and poetry. We all have faith in things - we believe in ideas, people, and even places. Whether you have read much poetry or not, you will soon learn that it is the perfect place to convey reflections on faith. Come along as we read a selection of fantastic poems and attempt to understand the faith of poets. In the process, we will seek to learn about our own faith, as well.

H1822: Homeric Qualities: An Evaluation of Gender in the Illiad and Odyssey
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Merrick Black

Was Homer a woman? Take a close read into gender representation in the Odyssey with an intended English major.


Prerequisites
Working knowledge of the Odyssey and preferably the Illiad as well. However, this is not a strict requirement, because I will pulling out quotes for examples!

H1731: Pirates on the High Seas Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Aaron Segal

If ye be wantin' to learn what it was really like to sail the high seas under the black flag, and to hear the true and grisly tales of the world's most fearsome pirates, come aboard! See how ye'd do as a buccaneer captain in the 17th century!

H1764: The American Poet
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

In roughly an hour, we will seek to develop a broad understanding of American poetry as we read a selection of American poets' work. Through this journey, we will notice certain features of our national heritage: the way we perceive our land, each other, and the world. Come curious and ready to encounter new ideas.

H1797: From Teacher to Student: the Origins and Differences in the Teachings of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Chanthia Ma

You've always heard about the philosophy of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle... but what did they really believe in? What did their works that build the foundations Western Philosophy really say? How did their teachings and theories evolve over time and from teacher to student? Come join me in discussing their ideas and ponderings!


Prerequisites
An interest in philosophical musings!

H1739: Beyond the Basics: Learning to Approach Literary Analysis from Unusual Angles
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sara Deeter

This class focuses on learning how to think outside the conventional English box when approaching literary analysis: instead of relying exclusively on basic critical perspectives such as formalist analysis (syntax, tone, imagery, style, etc.), historical/biographical analysis, gender or political theory, and overly common themes (death, love, power, hope, coming-of-age, etc.), we will discuss how to develop more original and unexpected critical approaches to authors like Shakespeare and J.K. Rowling. This will apply most directly to essay writing, though it can also relate to developing unique perspectives in students' creative work.


Prerequisites
Some background in English is highly recommended. Ideally, students will have had at least some experience with Shakespeare: though this is not required, students should at the very least review the basic plot and story elements of Romeo and Juliet. Students should also review or have read/watched the following modern works: J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series and the Disney film adaptations of Cinderella, The Little Mermaid, and the Lion King.

H1820: Environmental Justice
Difficulty: *

Environmentalism is more than just planting trees and recycling -- it encompasses issues relating to ethics, race, gender, class and justice. We will look at some environmental justice case studies, which reveal that low income communities as well as communities of color are disproportionately affected by environmental pollution.

Understanding environmental justice requires us to ask (1) who gets the benefits of environmental protection? (2) does everyone get a fair chance to voice their opinions? (3) who receives the effects if pollution is not dealt with? (4) who should bear the cost of environmental protection? (5) what hopeful examples can we add to this discussion? The question for us going forward is: what does an environmentally just world look like and what can we do to work towards it?

H1767: The Grid: Knowledge and System Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Peter Wang

Adopted from a seminar class at Yale, The Grid is an interdisciplinary class aiming to explore and analyze the grid system in every aspect of the world: land planning, mathematics, science, art, and more.
The grid is defined in an abstract sense, from physical grids to the structural systems in presentation and perception.


Prerequisites
No pre-requisites.

H1746: How to Tell a Great Story
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Theodoros Shim

Everyone speaks. Few people speak well. And the most important part of speaking is the story.

In this course, I will teach the basics of telling a story.

Everyone loves a great story. Learn how to tell one.

Fun stories, sad, stories, and personal stories will be part of the course.


Prerequisites
Have a good story to tell.

H1734: History of Marriage Equality
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Splash at Yale

Historical perspective on same-sex marriage in the United States, in the light of the Supreme Court's recent decision. Why marriage equality became a major controversy, and how social attitudes changed so quickly. Comparison to Ireland, which also legalized same-sex marriage in the summer.

H1775: Foundations of Feminism in Medieval Texts Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cynthia Jackson

By looking at the stories of Geoffrey Chaucer, Chretien de Troyes, and other Medieval authors, we will explore the answers to the following questions: What roles were females given by males within the text? How were females introduced/described by the author? What do these scenes tell us about early pro-feminine thought?

H1793: Positivity: The Power of Optimism Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Caitlin Dermody

Discover what it means to be positive!

H1786: Activism, the United States, and you!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trinh Truong

Virtually every major change in the United States involved American citizens working together to campaign for what they believed in. Activism has been an important, if not the most important, driving force for social and political change in the United States. This course will explore the role of activism behind major moments in United States history like the American Revolution, the Civil Rights Movement, and the modern day education reform movement. It will also explore the different forms of activism and how people today can take part in it. If you are looking to discover the importance of activism, or are interested in becoming an activist, this class is where you belong!

H1811: Civil Society and its Critics
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ugonna Eze

This class will be an investigation into political statesmanship and debates amongst political philosophers on citizenship and its role in political life. Students will be encouraged to think of statesmanship as a craft and investigate the role that laws, custom and education play in ordering a community. Readings will draw from excerpts from Plato, Aristotle, John Locke, Hobbes and others.


Prerequisites
None.

H1780: Words Well Exchanged: an Introduction to Old English Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Shu-han Luo

“Wise men should exchange words,” notes Anglo-Saxon lore. In this class, we will listen in on those witty conversations, from the classroom to the battlefield in Anglo-Saxon England. We begin with a fun crash course in the Old English language, sprinkled with group exercises for practice. We then move on to read selections from Old English texts — including Aelfric’s 'Colloquy' (a school text for Anglo Saxon children), Old English Riddles, and passages of heroic poetry — some in the original and some in translation. Beginners are welcome! Glossaries and translations will be provided.


Prerequisites
No prior knowledge of Old English required.

H1774: Nothing Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Qianyi Qin

Have you ever thought about the idea of “nothing”? We live in a world full of things. Look around your bedroom and you will see pens, chairs, lamps. Look out of the window and there are trees, streets and people walking by. Where can you see “nothing”? It’s really quite impossible for us to imagine what nothing looks like! European metaphysics has historically concerned itself with things and being. Yet in order to articulate what things are and what they do, philosophers often made use of the concept of nothing. Leibniz, for example, formulated the most fundamental philosophical question as “Why is there something rather than nothing?” But still, the meaning and function of “nothing” remains obscure.

Is nothing something? What kind of thing is it? Are there different kinds of nothing? How can we even speak of “nothing" when we can’t find its referent in this world? Nothing seems to be total negation of all the things that we obviously have in this world and therefore is a meaningless linguistic formulation. But negative terms like “non”, “not”, “-less”, “void”, “absence” and ”void” can be important to philosophical projects. Ancient Chinese thinker Lao Zi says that “Nameless is the beginning of heaven and earth.” The Buddha tells us that the world is empty “insofar as it is empty of a self or of anything pertaining to a self.” 

In this class, we will explore the idea of nothing with the help of texts from ancient Chinese thought, Buddhism and western philosophy. We will also share our experiences of nothing (if we have any experiences of it!) and maybe write some poetry about nothing at the end of the class. Come to this class if you enjoy perplexity and thinking about nothing!

H1743: Speechwriting in America
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Graham Ambrose

Read, discuss, and enjoy the art of speechwriting through the speeches that shaped the country and changed the world. Speeches examined will include all generations of leaders in American politics, social life, and culture from writers that include Patrick Henry, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Barbara Jordan, and Barack Obama.

H1825: Environmental Justice
Difficulty: *

Environmentalism is more than just planting trees and recycling -- it encompasses issues relating to ethics, race, gender, class and justice. We will look at some environmental justice case studies, which reveal that low income communities as well as communities of color are disproportionately affected by environmental pollution.

Understanding environmental justice requires us to ask (1) who gets the benefits of environmental protection? (2) does everyone get a fair chance to voice their opinions? (3) who receives the effects if pollution is not dealt with? (4) who should bear the cost of environmental protection? (5) what hopeful examples can we add to this discussion? The question for us going forward is: what does an environmentally just world look like and what can we do to work towards it?

H1802: Son of a Samurai: The Life of a Global Historian
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Daniel Pham

Why do we study history?
Kan'ichi Asakawa has an answer for us.
In this class, we will be looking at the life of Professor Asakawa, the first Japanese-American professor to teach at Yale. He was the son of a samurai, an immigrant-historian, and a diplomat on the world stage. His life challenges our notions of nationhood and the mind of the historian.
Topics include: The Boshin War and the Fall of the Shogun, Japanese American Immigration, and the Second World War

H1744: The Rise of Rome
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan France

Over the course of five hundred years, Rome transformed from a fledgling town in central Italy to the center of a trans-Mediterranean empire. This class will explore the city's rise to power and the historical events which pushed it to dominance.


Prerequisites
None, but some basic knowledge of Roman history would be helpful

H1809: Best Moments in Politics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Bernard Stanford

An overview of some of history's greatest absurdities, from the grandiose delusions of autocrats, to the "folksy charm" of certain politicians; the greatest gaffes, mistakes, miscues; the "What NOT to Do" guidelines that illustrate real political and historical principles.

WARNING You may find the material presented in this class offensive if you: have ever given yourself a military promotion to assuage the sting of a battle lost, were in charge of Azerbaijan's national Twitter account on Oct. 9th, 2013, or are, have been, or ever plan to be Herman Cain.


Prerequisites
Sense of Humor

H1737: Introductory French
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Peter Wyckoff

This class was created to allow students to have the most basic tools needed for a trip to France: very basic conversational French, a brief introduction to French culture and a short introduction to Paris.
About half of the class will be conversational games, the other half will be an interactive lecture including movie clips, songs, photo slideshows and a short game.

H1745: Entrepreneurship: The Stories
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Theodoros Shim

What is entrepreneurship?

We hear everyday the stories of Facebook, Snapchat, Tesla, and Apple.

Why are they successful? How did they start? How can I get involved in starting my own business?

This class is a mixture of fun personal stories (I've started a business, failed at a business, raised two different funding rounds for my current business), stories about startups in different spaces, and a guidemap for starting your own business.


Prerequisites
None

H1749: Queerness and Marginalization in the Classics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sherry Lee

A popular misconception in the modern world is that the classics and the Western canon are the subjects of 'dead white men' and have nothing to do with the rich plurality of ethnic, gender, and sexual diversity that the current social justice movement cares about elevating. The truth is that the Greeks and the Romans were more diverse than we think - they lived in a world of constant interaction with Africa and Asia, with homosexuality and genderqueerness, where gender and ethnicity were determined not by biological sex or skin color but by power. Through an investigation of historical, cultural, and literary texts both Greek and Roman, learn the truth about the Western canon and why it matters to people of all backgrounds today.

H1815: Geography for Humanity Full!
Difficulty: **

Want to see the world flipped upside down? Come and take a look at this and other unconventional maps. Learn the basics of human geography and see how our perspectives shape the world we see!


Math & Computer Science

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M1823: Introduction to Dynamical Systems
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Louis Gaudet

Generally speaking, dynamics is the study of how systems change and evolve over time. The theory of dynamical systems is applied in many different fields---physics, biology, economics, and sociology, to name a few---but it is also a captivating study in its own right. Here, we'll look at several examples of mathematical dynamical systems, and in the process we'll develop some language and explore some tools mathematicians use to study and describe this vast and beautiful theory. See you there!


Prerequisites
None, besides a willingness to participate during class.

M1730: The Mathemagic of Cards Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Adam Zucker

Ever wanted to impress some friends with magic? Well now's your chance! In this class, we will go over some easy yet amazing self-working card tricks and the math and algorithms behind how they work. Since these tricks are self-working, no knowledge of sleight of hand is required. Cards will be provided.


Prerequisites
Knowlege of basic algebra (Pre-algebra, Algebra I)

M1810: Artificial Intelligence and Neural Networks
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tyler Petrochko

An introduction to neural networks, genetic algorithms and other artificial intelligence technologies.

We will cover genetic algorithms (programs that can evolve and reproduce), human-computer interfaces (e.g. Siri, Google Now), and the applications of deep learning in the modern day.

M1759: Mathematical Paradoxes Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Una Boyle

When math simply just doesn't make sense!

Paradoxes are one of the coolest things to look at for a beginner mathematician like you! Come discover when logic fails in the seemingly air-tight world of mathematics - it happens!

M1816: Machine Learning - Ideas and Applications Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kenan Jia

How do E-commerce websites like Amazon make recommendations based on your past purchase history? How does the photo tagging application in Facebook and Apple work? What are the algorithms behind Gmail's spam filter and credit card companies' fraud detection models?

Machine Learning (ML) is a powerful subset of Artificial Intelligence that enables computers to "learn" and detect patterns in existing data and make meaningful predictions. ML develops algorithms that are closely related to data mining and analysis tools in statistics. This course will cover the basic ideas in Machine Learning and its applications in various fields. Topics such as supervised/unsupervised learning and classification trees will be discussed.


Prerequisites
We will be focusing more on the higher-level overview and applications of machine learning, rather than writing actual programs. Concepts in statistics, math, and computer science will be discussed, but previous experience is not required.

M1813: The Fibonacci Sequence & More Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Milo Brandt

Ever wondered where the seemingly magical formulae for Fibonacci numbers and other recursive sequences come from? Wish you could derive impressive results with just a little algebra? In this class, we will explore the concept of a generating function, which lets us apply deceptively simple algebraic techniques to determine closed forms for a large variety of recursive sequences.


Prerequisites
A solid understanding of algebra will be necessary.

M1753: Programming from Scratch Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Saran Morgan

Ever wanted to learn how to think like a programmer and produce your own games, interactive art, or animations that you can share with friends? In this class, we'll be working with Scratch. Scratch is a visual programming language and fun stepping stone into the world of coding. For beginners.


Prerequisites
None preferred.

M1765: Prove it! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Una Boyle

Mathematics is based on proof, i.e. logical justification. This class will introduce a few common techniques, including direct proof, proof by induction, and proof by contradiction, for proving mathematical statements. I will give a brief lecture with some examples, and then we will work in groups on some cool problems to practice these techniques. This class will show you how simply and elegantly some mathematical facts can be proved!


Prerequisites
Algebra & a curiosity for how math works!

M1736: P vs NP in Physical Phenomena
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jeffrey Lai

$\mathbf P$ vs $\mathbf {NP}$ is the holy grail of unsolved problems in computability, dealing with what can and cannot be computed in any reasonable amount of time. In this course we will discuss evidence that $\mathbf P \neq \mathbf{NP}$ as it appears in the physical world. An understanding of $\mathbf P$ vs $\mathbf{NP}$ is NOT required for this course.


Prerequisites
Some background is physics is definitely required. We will be discussing physics in this class, and while formulas will not be used a lot, a basic intuition with regards to physical phenomena will be required. The format of the class will be using a number of thought experiments relating to various physical phenomena. Thus knowledge of every phenomena we cover is not required, however it will make some examples more enlightening. We will use examples ranging from time travel to special relativity to quantum computing. An understanding of P vs NP is not required.

M1754: Introduction to Data Science Full!
Difficulty: **

How do we start to make sense of "big data"? Come learn about the tools and applications of data science to modern day problems ranging from social media to medical analysis.

We'll be going over interactive demos, so just you can sit back and relax - no programming required.

M1826: Exploratory Data Science in R Full!
Difficulty: ***

How do we start to make sense of "big data"? Come learn how to use the statistical programming language R to analyze and visualize data like a data scientist.

We'll be working through problems as a class and writing code together to solve real-world problems!

Exposure to data analysis (such as the Introduction to Data Science class M1754) or programming in any language is strongly recommended


Prerequisites
Introduction to Data Science M1754 (recommended), Some exposure to data analysis or programming in any language (strongly recommended)

M1761: Famous Mathematicians: Archimedes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Una Boyle

Mathematics has been developing for thousands of years. In this class, we'll learn about Archimedes and some of the mathematics he developed so many years ago in Ancient Greece. We'll take a look at his unique way of computing areas and volumes of geometric shapes, his fascination with the number infinity, and how he was able to approximate pi. You'll be surprised at how much he accomplished with the relatively simple mathematics of his day!


Prerequisites
Basic algebra and geometry

M1796: Prime numbers demystified Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stanislav Atanasov

Prime numbers have captured our imagination ever since Antiquity. Nevertheless, some of the questions posed by the Ancient Greeks still remain unsolved nowadays, some 2000 years later. As the great mathematician Hardy once complained, when it comes to primes, every fool can ask questions that even the wisest man cannot answer. We will start by some classical results such as the proof that there are infinitely many primes and slowly introduce more modern approaches, all built upon elementary yet ingenious ideas. We will finish with some results that are not older than a year! In this talk we will explore the exciting world of twin primes, cousin primes and … sexy primes (yes, such do exist)!


Prerequisites
Knowledge of basic algebra is expected, but the talk should be accessible to general audience. Occasionally, I might go into some slightly more technical arguments for the more mathematically inclined members of our audience, but they will not be crucial for the understanding of the topic.

M1741: The Reeb Foliation of the 3-Sphere
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dan Zaharopol

First, you get a circle. Go up a dimension and you get a "normal" sphere. Go up another dimension and you get the 3-sphere. This is a really interesting object: it has to sit inside four dimensions, because it doesn't fit in three-dimensional space, and it has a number of really interesting properties. We're going to study those properties, first by figuring out exactly what this 3-sphere thing is, and then by analyzing it by taking a "foliation." If that doesn't make sense, don't worry about it --- we'll go over it in class. But if you want to start to visualize things in four dimensions, this is a great class to do so.

The main portion of this class will take about an hour and fifteen minutes; the rest of the time will be used for any questions you have about higher-dimensional geometry or topology.

M1760: Code-breaking
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Una Boyle

Also known as cryptography - one of the most useful and powerful mathematical tools used today. If you've watched The Imitation Game, then you might have an idea of what to expect in this class (and if you haven't watched it, I'd highly recommend it !) We will look at how people can hide their messages in plain sight, and how you can also uncover these secret messages!

There will be races and prizes to see who can crack certain codes the quickest!


Science

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S1750: Cancer in Everyone
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Nicholas Smith

You, yes YOU, have many tumors inside of you right now. Find out why each and every one of us inevitably develops cancer. This class will explore what cancer is at the molecular, genetic, and cellular levels. Find out why cancer treatment has been such a failure, what it means to be a cancer researcher, and what cutting edge technology might play a future role in cancer treatment.


Prerequisites
A good understanding of biology and chemistry recommended.

S1798: Chemical Biology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Catherine Stark

Organic chemistry. Biochemistry. Chemical biology. Are these synonyms? They sure sound the same! Come learn about how biology and chemistry can be combined in interesting ways to explore fascinating biological systems. We will focus on chemical biology, specifically bioorthogonal chemistry, protein bioconjugation, as well as protein engineering. This class is geared towards anyone with an interest in biology and chemistry. No previous experience necessary.


Prerequisites
A general appreciation for cool science.

S1785: Chemical Reactions
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Andrew Brod

Through a series of demonstrations, we will explore the foundations of chemistry. There will be fire.

S1814: Why Play Nice?: Cooperation in Evolution Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milo Brandt

"Survival of the fittest" suggests that evolution is a fight, each organism vying for its own survival. Yet, in nature, we observe organisms cooperating and even making sacrifices for one another. Learn how evolution encourages cooperative behavior by playing simple games and using the lens of games to shed light on this peculiar aspect of evolution.

S1755: Let's Fold a Protein
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Emmy Yang

Proteins perform a vast number of roles from providing structural support to cells to catalyzing the biochemical reactions in our body. Thanks to modern science, we can visualize the intricate structures of proteins to better understand their function. In this course, you will learn about the different levels of protein structure and fold a zinc finger protein!


Prerequisites
Biology highly recommended

S1818: Basics of Biology: Cloning
Difficulty: **

Explore with us the evolution of one of the most basic protocols in molecular and cellular biology, cloning. Both the cloning of genes and the cloning of organisms. We'll talk about a range from E. coli to Dolly the Sheep and describe the ways we can manipulate DNA within organisms and what that means for the science of biology. We'll also go into the nitty gritty of the protocols and show you the latest techniques in cloning you're sure to see in a future career in the life sciences.

S1771: Theoretical Quantum Mechanics
Difficulty: ****
Teachers: Spencer Rogers

Quantum theory, the prevailing physical theory of light and matter, is beautiful. It says essentially that the state of a physical system is given by a vector (something like an arrow, or set of numbers), $$\psi$$, which lives in a mathematical space called Hilbert Space. Things we can observe, like position, momentum, and energy are represented by mathematical operators that act on vectors in the space. By solving so-called "eigenvalue problems" involving these operators, one may begin to see the different values that the observables can take. The aim of this course is to impart some understanding of what this all means, and hopefully spark some interest in some of quantum mechanics' unintuitive implications-- for instance, we will find that we cannot observe a particle to have a definite position and momentum at the same time.


Prerequisites
No math beyond algebra assumed.

S1738: The evolutionary biology of teeth: from leeches to you!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: David Minoli

Did you know that the very first bony structure to appear on Earth was a tooth? Join me for a 50-minute whirlwind tour of the history of teeth and their fundamental importance to the rise of life as we know it. Why are our teeth harder than bone? Why do we lose teeth, and armadillos don't? When, and why, did a fish capable of crushing steel beams in its jaws ever swim in our oceans? Find out all this and more as we run through the fascinating evolution of your pearly whites.


Prerequisites
Being happy to listen to a lecture on teeth for 50 minutes, willingness to view some slightly graphic medical images.

S1788: Darwin, Mendel, and the Origin of Life
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ryan Malpass

This course will cover the development of life from simple prokaryotes to multicellular eukaryotes and all the branches of life, tracing back to the development of the first protocells likely created by hydrothermal vents. This class will cover the genome, Darwin, Mendel, and billions of years of evolutionary history.


Prerequisites
Some understanding of cell structure, the differences between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the structure of DNA

S1733: What makes a dinosaur a dinosaur?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Adrien Gau

Dinosaurs are really cool. There are a lot of other prehistoric creatures that are also really cool, however, and people mix dinosaurs and non-dinosaurs up all the time. We've also made a lot of new discoveries about dinosaurs that haven't reached pop culture (or were completely ignored as in the case of Jurassic World). So if you're interested in finding out what is and isn't a dinosaur, well, I guess this is the class for you! Bring all and any dinosaur questions you might've had since you were 5 years old but your parents couldn't answer, as well as a willingness to accept the fact that T. rex probably had feathers. (You wouldn't believe the amount of literature--and public stubbornness--that attempts to disprove the idea of feathered dinosaurs.)


Prerequisites
A basic understanding of evolution, bones, and big numbers; I would recommend Googling 'phylogenetic tree' but I'll go over that in class anyway so no big deal.

S1799: An Introduction to Yourself: Thinking About Your Brain
Difficulty: **
Teachers: John Baxter

Ever wondered about that thing between your ears? Ever wondered what exactly goes on in those brain scanning machines? Ever wondered about what happens when the brain is injured/manipulated? If so, this course is for you. We'll be discussing some basic neuroscience, the anatomy of the brain and its functions, and all of the behavioral effects that arise out of its mysterious functionalities.

S1777: Astro 101: Astrometry or Angles on the Sky Full!
Difficulty: **

Ever wondered why the Winter sky and the Summer sky are different? Or how to determine your local time and position using only the stars, just like the ancient civilisations used to do? Then this is the perfect class for you!

We will cover everything related to basic coordinate systems to spherical angles and positions to spherical trigonometry. When taught before, the class was described as "with just the right pace, so that we cover a wide range of ideas without losing track of what is going on". Come and you will not regret it!


Prerequisites
Some trig and some spacial vision skills, and you're good to go!

S1800: Chemistry of Fireworks Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aaron Featherston

Fireworks are a central point for many celebrations, providing the audience with an impressive display of patterns, a vast array of colors, and, of course, loud booms! Using chemistry, we will explore the many different aspects of fireworks that culminate to make these spectacles possible.

S1740: Enzymes in Action: Chemistry and Demonstrations of Biological Machines
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Koronkiewicz

Are you alive? Are you interested in why that is so? Budding biologists and chemists unite! This class will cover the amazing world of chemical reactions catalyzed by proteins. Thorough but brief, we will focus on a few accessible examples of enzymes and the theory of how they work . The entire class will be supplemented by demonstrations which will allow students to learn an interesting characteristic of enzyme catalysis. These lessons will be further supported through useful discussion and helpful, custom-tailored images of structure-function relationships in enzyme catalysis. Material is applicable to fields of chemistry, biology, and medicine.


Prerequisites
Some exposure to biology and chemistry. Willingness to share thoughts and observations.

S1808: Take Heart. Take Part Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alpha Phi Yale

Do you want to learn life-saving CPR? Take Heart. Take Part. is an educational initiative introduced in February 2014 by Alpha Phi Foundation to educate communities and campuses across North America about life-saving CPR in order to save more lives from cardiac arrest - a leading cause of death. The program is designed to expand public awareness of cardiac arrest, provide the life-saving skill of Hands-Only™ CPR, and implement automated external defibrillator (AED) programs.


Prerequisites
none

S1778: Baby Brains and Toddler Thinking
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rachel Han

Ever wondered what's going on inside a baby's brain? Why is it making that face? Why is it producing such bizarre sounds? Come on a journey through the minds of young children as we discuss some key studies, concepts, and insights from developmental psychology!

S1773: Origins of Life- A Chemist's Perspective
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Saydjari

How did we come to be? This question resonates throughout history and touches every discipline. Herein, we explore both competing historical perspectives and cutting-edge theories/research from a chemical perspective. Focus will be given to many supposed paradoxes and controversies (i.e. Faint Sun, Levinthal's, ...). The culmination of our work will knock down the wall between kinetics and thermodynamics-- breaking the cardinal rule of chemistry.


Miscellaneous

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X1812: Decoding Language
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tom McCoy

There are over 6,000 languages in the world. How do these languages communicate the same information in wildly different ways? What patterns exist across all languages? How do computers encode the structure of language? Learn the answers to these questions and more by solving fun language puzzles. In the process, discover surprising truths about unfamiliar languages and even about English itself.

X1770: Top Secret: Unethical Human Experiments of the 20th Century
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Abdallah

From illegal drug testing, to secret chemical weapons development, to psychological torture, scientific research has long been marred by unethical practices. This course will cover the details of several infamous experiments on human subjects, what made them unethical, and how that unethicality was concealed from the general public.

Note: Contains some mildly graphic content.

X1742: Speed Stacking for Beginners
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Danielle Currin

A fun, interactive introduction to the methods behind the art of cup stacking. Never heard of cup stacking before? Check out this video -- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sa9cXHGZHc -- for a preview of what we'll be practicing in class. All levels of expertise are welcome, but this class will be geared towards those with minimal experience.

X1783: Meditation for Beginners Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Greg Suralik

In today's hectic world, people have begun to meditate now more than ever in order to manage their stress. But what exactly is mindful meditation, and what benefits does it bring? This course hopes to explain the science of meditation and teach the basic skills necessary in order to make meditation a part of your everyday life.


Prerequisites
None

X1787: Why School Matters
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Dan Rubins

In Why School Matters, we'll talk about one of the biggest (maybe THE biggest) problems in the United States: the giant gap in K-12 education and in educational opportunities for American kids. Our discussion will be centered on YOUR experiences: come ready to talk about your own educational experiences and how you think they have influenced you and will continue to influence you. We won't solve any big problems in our 2 hours together, but we'll start talking about the questions that matter the most!

X1805: Diplomacy and War
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Joseph Tomchak

When do countries sign agreements and when do they go to war? This class examines diplomatic decision making and how military force is used to achieve political goals. The class will end with an interactive game where you must decide the fate of your nation...

X1762: Aliens of the Deep: Cephalopods
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ethan Young

The molluscan class of cephalopods includes some of nature's strangest and most interesting organisms. Come along as we learn about the cuttlefish, octopus, nautilus, and squid through science, literature, and film. In addition to the course material, you will have a chance to dissect a squid, explicate great poetry, and enjoy classic movies. No background in any of these fields is required.

X1795: Game Theory: How to Win at Life Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Annie Chen, Colin Hill

Game theory is the study of conflict and cooperation between intelligent, rational (that's you!) decision-makers.

Do you want to learn how to maximize your Oreo earnings in a game of "Prisoner's Dilemma?" Or understand why you make the decisions you make?

Then come extend your Monopoly strategy to understand real-word phenomena such as political campaigns, competition among corporations, and even the ideal eBay bid!

X1801: Public Transit in the Americas
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Sandweiss

How can we move within a city efficiently? What problems can be solved with improved transit? How do cities develop around transportation centers? These are questions that are at the center of urban development in the 21st century and the questions we will begin to answer in this course. "Public Transit in the Americas" will delve into urban transportation in North and South America, looking at a variety of transit systems, transit-oriented development, and the future of transportation.

X1751: The US Healthcare System & Affordable Care Act
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nicholas Smith

The current US health expenditure is 2.9 trillion dollars - higher than any other country in the world. And yet, our health outcomes are some of the worst when compared to peer countries. What accounts for such high expenditure? Why are our outcomes so bad? What kinds of inefficiencies exist in the system, and what kinds of solutions have been proposed? What is Obamacare, what effects does it have? All these questions and more.

X1794: Vámanos on the Way of St. James
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jessica Wu

What is a pilgrimage? Why have people walked across Spain since the 11th century? We will journey toward the Cathedral at Santiago de Compostela and learn about the history behind the Way of St. James. You'll also have the opportunity to start planning your own journey!


Prerequisites
N/A

X1756: Stretching for the Soul
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Emmy Yang

Stretch for flexibility. Stretch for relaxation. Stretch for your soul. Discover muscles you didn’t know existed in this 50-minute full body elongation. Whether you’re a supple yogini or a fresh beginner, you can benefit from this opportunity to connect with your body.


Prerequisites
Please come in comfortable and loose clothes (jeans not recommended).

X1821: Experiments in Cookie Science Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rachel Lawrence

The perfect chocolate chip cookie is a magical thing, but not all cookies are created equal. We'll find out exactly what goes into making a cookie on the molecular level, and then do some experimental baking to determine how slightly different recipes can lead to surprising results.


Prerequisites
Contact rachel.lawrence@yale.edu before signing up if you have any food allergies or dietary restrictions.

X1752: Saving Lives - CPR and AED
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Razvan Azamfirei

Wanna learn something that can potentially save someone's life? Are you interested in being a doctor so you wanna learn something that doctors do on a daily basis? Do you have what it takes to be a hero in your community? If you answered yes to any of the questions, join this class. We will cover basic CPR and AED skills, so you'll learn how to recognize if someone is ill enough to require CPR and what to do.

X1817: Spanish 1 (Conversational Spanish) Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Adriana Gradilla

I will teach students basic questions and common words that are used when having "small chat" conversations with others in Spanish. This will be geared towards being able to collect information that you would use in networking events.


Prerequisites
just knowledge of the Spanish Alphabet

X1819: Intro to Poker Theory Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mitchell Harris

In addition to reviewing the rules of Texas Hold'em poker, we will discuss expected value, pot odds, and other applications of probability to poker. We will then simulate a few hands of poker, using what we learned.


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of probability

X1807: How to Stay in Power Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Joseph Tomchak

So say you find yourself king, how do you prevent your rivals from taking your throne? From democratically elected leaders to absolute dictators, coming to power doesn't mean you stay there. This class examines some strategies used by leaders to keep power, comparing and contrasting leaders in different systems. It ends with a simulation game, will you learn enough to survive the struggle for power...?

X1747: College Admissions: The Signal and the Noise Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

With apologies to Nate Silver for borrowing from the title of this book, this class, led by a former admissions officer at a highly selective institution, will help students determine the "signal" (what's important) from the "noise" (what the neighbors are gossiping about and what's irrelevant.) In this discussion, we'll help you focus your path to college to make your time as effective as possible and to help you ignore misleading or counterproductive information.

X1776: Home Is Where the Heart Is. On Becoming International Student (and Exploring the World)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vanda Cernohorska

Have you ever dreamt about exploring the world? Come join me, an international student from Europe, as we will talk about the many advantages (but also challenges!) of packing your suitcase and setting out on an adventure of your life.

X1803: Philosophy, Software, and Intellectual Honesty Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Karl Notturno

What do Python and Plato have in common? What is tradition and why do we care? What is the meaning of life?

Come talk about the important questions.


Prerequisites
Some computer science or philosophy background is helpful. Basic reasoning skills and a willingness to engage in conversation are a must.

X1766: Origami: Collision of Art and Science Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Peter Wang

Origami, the art of paper folding, has captured the attention of artists, engineers and scientists alike. The elegant nature of origami can be appreciated both artistically and analytically.
In this class, we will explore some of the most fascinating types of origami, such as modular, tessellation, and realistic origami, and briefly discuss the quantitative and scientific ways of analyses, as well as an introduction to some ideas of art behind origami.
Demonstrations and hands-on activities included!


Prerequisites
No origami, mathematics, or art experiences are required.

X1827: Diving Deeper than just "Inside Out" of Our Emotions Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Quyen Do

Disney-Pixar's "Inside Out" was an undoubtedly heartwarming film, but emotions are much more complex than just five animated characters controlling our expressions and behaviors. Our emotions are largely based on our experiences with other people and events in our lives. What's cool about emotions is that as we gain life experiences, we learn more about the ways in which we recognize, express, label, and regulate our emotions. We may not always realize it, but we're capable of being more in control of our emotions than the characters of "Inside Out" may lead us to believe.


Prerequisites
If you've ever experienced an emotion before, this might be the class for you.

X1732: The Art of War: Strategy and Wisdom Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aaron Segal

The Art of War is an ancient book of strategy said to be from the Chinese master general Sun Tzu. Written 2,500 years ago, it is still carried in the pockets of successful generals, executives, and politicians today. Learn how to command troops, foretell victory, avoid defeat, and become a successful general. Then test your skill in a war game!