ESP Biography



TIMOTHY FOLDY-PORTO, Yale junior




Major: Physics

College/Employer: Yale

Year of Graduation: 2020

Picture of Timothy Foldy-Porto

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Not Available.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Introduction to Relativity in Splash Spring 19 (Apr. 06, 2019)
This will be a qualitative introduction to relativity. We'll start by discussing some of the experiments that motivated Einstein to develop this theory, and then move on to the implications of special and general relativity, including time dilation, length contraction, the equivalence principle, and the curvature of spacetime. Beware: while there will be very little math (if any) in this course, the concepts discuss will be quite complicated and potentially confusing.


Introduction to Relativity in Sprout Spring 19 (Feb. 16 - Mar. 02, 2019)
This will be a qualitative introduction to relativity. We'll start by discussing some of the experiments that motivated Einstein to develop this theory, and then move on to the implications of special and general relativity, including time dilation, length contraction, the equivalence principle, and the curvature of spacetime. Beware: while there will be very little math (if any) in this course, the concepts discuss will be quite complicated and potentially confusing.


Math for Computer Science in Sprout Spring 18 (Feb. 17 - Mar. 03, 2018)
What do class scheduling, data routing, sorting algorithms, and choosing 12 donuts from 5 types have in common? All of those problems can be solved using the math learned in this class. We will go over the math that you DIDN'T learn in middle school, such as graph theory (the graph coloring problem, stable marriage problem), sums and recurrences, counting (sounds simple but is the coolest thing you'll learn), and probability (hint, it's not what you'd expect). If you're interested in the design and analysis of algorithms, this class is for you!


Math for Computer Science in Sprout Fall 17 (Sep. 30 - Oct. 14, 2017)
What do class scheduling, data routing, sorting algorithms, and choosing 12 donuts from 5 types have in common? All of those problems can be solved using the math learned in this class. We will go over the math that you DIDN'T learn in high school, such as graph theory (the graph coloring problem, stable marriage problem), sums and recurrences, counting (sounds simple but is the coolest thing you'll learn), and probability (hint, it's not what you'd expect). If you're interested in the design and analysis of algorithms, this class is for you!


Math for Computer Science in Splash Fall 17 (Nov. 11, 2017)
What do class scheduling, data routing, sorting algorithms, and choosing 12 donuts from 5 types have in common? All of those problems can be solved using the math learned in this class. We will go over the math that you DIDN'T learn in high school, such as graph theory (the graph coloring problem, stable marriage problem), sums and recurrences, counting (sounds simple but is the coolest thing you'll learn), and probability (hint, it's not what you'd expect). If you're interested in the design and analysis of algorithms, this class is for you!


Math for Computer Science in Splash Spring 17 (Apr. 08, 2017)
What do class scheduling, data routing, sorting algorithms, and choosing 12 donuts from 5 types have in common? All of those problems can be solved using the math learned in this class. We will go over the math that you DIDN'T learn in high school, such as graph theory (the graph coloring problem, stable marriage problem), sums and recurrences, counting (sounds simple but is the coolest thing you'll learn), and probability (hint, it's not what you'd expect). If you're interested in the design and analysis of algorithms, this class is for you!


From Aristotle to Dark Energy: A Crash Course in Astronomy in Splash Fall 16 (Nov. 05, 2016)
Curious about the origin of the universe? What about how the planets got their surfaces? Or this thing called dark energy? This course will cover all of that and more! That said, we will most likely NOT be covering Aristotle because he was wrong about pretty much everything when it came to astronomy.


Exploring Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence in Splash Fall 16 (Nov. 05, 2016)
This course will look at the current state of the field of artificial intelligence. We will be discussing some basic neuroscience as well as the "biological" algorithms that currently try to implement that knowledge. A strong background in STEM is encouraged but by no means required. If enough humanities people show up we can discuss the philosophical and ethical side of AI as well!


Exploring Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence in Sprout Fall 16 (Oct. 01 - 15, 2016)
This course will be half lecture, half discussion. We will cover the problem of artificial intelligence (both technologically and ethically), types of intelligent machines, current approaches to AI, and where the field is heading going into the 21st century. We will also be discussing a little bit of neuroscience, more specifically the physical structure of the brain and how neural networks are formed.


From Aristotle to Dark Energy: A Crash Course in Astronomy in Sprout Fall 16 (Oct. 01 - 15, 2016)
This course will be a basic, non-mathematical overview of our universe! We'll start in ancient Greece with Aristotle and work our way up through Galileo, Kepler, and Hubble until we reach current times, along the way discussing the origin of our planet and the solar system, the sun and other stars, galaxies, and finally the structure of our universe.