ESP Biography



MICHAEL GROME, Yale PhD Student in DNA Nanotechnology




Major: Cell Biology

College/Employer: Yale

Year of Graduation: G

Picture of Michael Grome

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I am starting my second year of graduate research in molecular biology, here at Yale. I graduated from Cornell University in 2013 with dual degrees in Plant Science and Natural Resources. This is my second time teaching for Sprout. My academic interests center on agricultural biotechnology, evolution, and epistemology. There are many people (scientists included) who lack comprehensive understanding of science, context, and certainty that lead to unnecessary ideological clashes. Often times, we find ourselves arguing with people only to realize we believe in similar concepts, but contrast in our definitions and terminology.



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Nanobots and Nanomachines in Splash Summer 15
Science fiction is filled with futuristic technology including microscopic machines that enter the human body and perform tasks. Well, science fiction NO MORE!!! We will be discussing the technology behind current "nano" machines, built at scales where ~10,000 machines can fit within the diameter of a human hair. The end of the class is a discussion into future perspectives of these nanomachines.


Genetic Engineering (of Plants) in Splash Summer 15
Biotechnology is rapidly growing as a set of tools to meet a variety of human needs through the use and manipulation of biological systems, chemistry, and processes. With an ever-growing population and concern over environmental health, genetic engineering is one tool now widely used in agriculture and research to improve crops, reduce resource use, study biological systems, and meet human needs. However, with this new technology come new concerns that lead people to question the efficacy of this technology to meet our needs safely and responsibly. This is a four week course condensed and summarized in one class. The class will begin with brief introductions to complex topics in biology required to understand genetic engineering of plant systems. The next part will discuss methods of genetic engineering (including applications and limitations), while the final part will be a walkthrough of controversies surrounding the technology (topics may include food security, safety, efficacy, health effects, ethics, and ecology).


Knowledge CLASH!: Science & Society in Splash Summer 15
As science is evermore incorporated into nearly every facet of our society, conflicts arise at areas of overlap, largely driven by political strife and misunderstanding on all sides. This is an instructor-led discussion, focusing on areas where science and society meet and are often perceived to conflict. Topics may include religion, ancient and current public perception, epistemology, cultural and historical context, biotechnology, enviromentalism, politics, education, or formal/informal logic, depending largely on student interest.


Science and Society (Interpretation, Certainty, & Authority) in Sprout Summer 2014
As science is evermore incorporated into nearly every facet of our society, conflicts arise at areas of overlap, largely driven by political strife and misunderstanding on all sides. This class is an 80 minute, onetime instructor-led discussion, focusing on areas where science and society meet and are often perceived to conflict. Topics may include religion, public perception, epistemology, biotechnology, enviromentalism, politics, education, or formal/informal logic, depending largely on student interest.


Intro to Genetic Engineering (of Plants) in Sprout Summer 2014
Biotechnology is rapidly growing as a set of tools to meet a variety of human needs through the use and manipulation of biological systems, chemistry, and processes. With an ever-growing population and concern over environmental health, genetic engineering is one tool now widely used in agriculture and research to improve crops, reduce resource use, study biological systems, and meet human needs. However, with this new technology come new concerns that lead people to question the efficacy of this technology to meet our needs safely and responsibly. The first three sections are generalized introductions to complex topics in biology required to understand genetic engineering of plant systems. The third class, specifically, will discuss methods of genetic engineering (including applications and limitations), while the final class will be an interactive lecture on controversies surrounding the technology (topics may include food security, safety, efficacy, health effects, ethics, and ecology). General Breakdown: Week 1: Plant Biology Week 2: Molecular Biology Week 3: Genetic Engineering Week 4: Controversies