Splash Biography



MICHAEL GROME, Yale PhD Student in DNA Nanotechnology




Major: Cell Biology

College/Employer: Yale

Year of Graduation: G

Picture of Michael Grome

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Michael Grome received his B.S. degrees in Plant Molecular Biology and Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He is currently studying DNA Nanotechnology as a PhD student with Dr. Chenxiang Lin within the Cell Biology Department at Yale University where he works on nanostructures to physically manipulate cell membranes. He teaches various courses for Yale Pathways to Science and Yale Splash centered around genetically modified organisms, philosophy of science, and controversies in Science and Society.



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

S3764: Science, Society, & Controversy - Thinking Like a Scientist in Splash Spring 19 (Apr. 06, 2019)
Class Description: Socratic Seminar - this class is about thinking! Be ready to listen, share your thoughts, and challenge the teacher, as well as each other. What we'll discuss: -What is Science? -How does Science relate to Society and vice versa? -Scientific Lingo -Semantics (e.g. belief, proof) -Context: why belief in dragons is reasonable or not -Certainty, Subjectivity, & Objectivity -Scientific Method -Logic & Fallacies -Science-Public Controversies (may touch on climate change, gluten, GMOs, evolution, vaccines, junk food, designer babies, etc - determined by class interest)


E3332: Science, Society, & Controversy - Thinking Like a Scientist in Sprout Fall 18 (Sep. 29 - Oct. 13, 2018)
Socratic Seminar - this class is about thinking! Be ready to listen and share your thoughts. What we'll discuss: -What is Science? -How does Science relate to Society and vice versa? -Scientific Lingo -Semantics (e.g. belief, proof) -Context: why dragons are real! -Certainty, Subjectivity, & Objectivity -Scientific Method -Logic & Fallacies -Science-Public Controversies (may touch on climate change, gluten, GMOs, evolution, vaccines, junk food, etc - determined by class interest)


E1636: Nanobots and Nanomachines in Splash Summer 15 (Jul. 25 - 26, 2015)
Science fiction is filled with futuristic technology including microscopic machines that enter the human body and perform tasks. Well, science fiction NO MORE!!! We will be discussing the technology behind current "nano" machines, built at scales where ~10,000 machines can fit within the diameter of a human hair. The end of the class is a discussion into future perspectives of these nanomachines.


S1637: Genetic Engineering (of Plants) in Splash Summer 15 (Jul. 25 - 26, 2015)
Biotechnology is rapidly growing as a set of tools to meet a variety of human needs through the use and manipulation of biological systems, chemistry, and processes. With an ever-growing population and concern over environmental health, genetic engineering is one tool now widely used in agriculture and research to improve crops, reduce resource use, study biological systems, and meet human needs. However, with this new technology come new concerns that lead people to question the efficacy of this technology to meet our needs safely and responsibly. This is a four week course condensed and summarized in one class. The class will begin with brief introductions to complex topics in biology required to understand genetic engineering of plant systems. The next part will discuss methods of genetic engineering (including applications and limitations), while the final part will be a walkthrough of controversies surrounding the technology (topics may include food security, safety, efficacy, health effects, ethics, and ecology).


H1639: Knowledge CLASH!: Science & Society in Splash Summer 15 (Jul. 25 - 26, 2015)
As science is evermore incorporated into nearly every facet of our society, conflicts arise at areas of overlap, largely driven by political strife and misunderstanding on all sides. This is an instructor-led discussion, focusing on areas where science and society meet and are often perceived to conflict. Topics may include religion, ancient and current public perception, epistemology, cultural and historical context, biotechnology, enviromentalism, politics, education, or formal/informal logic, depending largely on student interest.


S1150: Science and Society (Interpretation, Certainty, & Authority) in Sprout Summer 2014 (Jul. 12 - Aug. 02, 2014)
As science is evermore incorporated into nearly every facet of our society, conflicts arise at areas of overlap, largely driven by political strife and misunderstanding on all sides. This class is an 80 minute, onetime instructor-led discussion, focusing on areas where science and society meet and are often perceived to conflict. Topics may include religion, public perception, epistemology, biotechnology, enviromentalism, politics, education, or formal/informal logic, depending largely on student interest.


F1152: Intro to Genetic Engineering (of Plants) in Sprout Summer 2014 (Jul. 12 - Aug. 02, 2014)
Biotechnology is rapidly growing as a set of tools to meet a variety of human needs through the use and manipulation of biological systems, chemistry, and processes. With an ever-growing population and concern over environmental health, genetic engineering is one tool now widely used in agriculture and research to improve crops, reduce resource use, study biological systems, and meet human needs. However, with this new technology come new concerns that lead people to question the efficacy of this technology to meet our needs safely and responsibly. The first three sections are generalized introductions to complex topics in biology required to understand genetic engineering of plant systems. The third class, specifically, will discuss methods of genetic engineering (including applications and limitations), while the final class will be an interactive lecture on controversies surrounding the technology (topics may include food security, safety, efficacy, health effects, ethics, and ecology). General Breakdown: Week 1: Plant Biology Week 2: Molecular Biology Week 3: Genetic Engineering Week 4: Controversies