Splash Biography



JULIAN BERNARD, I'm a fan of engineering, design, and board games!




Major: undeclared

College/Employer: Yale

Year of Graduation: 2022

Picture of Julian Bernard

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I'm a sophomore, I have not declared a major. I'm a fan of engineering, board games, and painting. Talk to me about the newest advances in nanotechnology, the snazziest FRC robot you've seen, your favorite water color artist, or anything in between. I attended Splash and Spark as a student but have been having even more fun as a teacher!



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

S3969: A Flyby of Orbital Mechanics in Splash Fall 2019 (Nov. 16, 2019)
Have you ever wondered why rockets have "launch windows," how some satellites always stay directly overhead, why rovers are only sent to Mars every 26 months, or how scientists detect exoplanets thousands of light-years away? What if I told you that for a capsule to catch up to the International Space Station, it actually has to slow down? The physics of orbiting objects can be strange, but we'll explore all these topics (and more), predict some upcoming astronomical events, and maybe even plan an interplanetary mission of our own!


S4046: Will Humanity Survive In 2050? in Splash Fall 2019 (Nov. 16, 2019)
A third of the earth rendered inhabitable. Over a billion people displaced. Outright political chaos. And far worse in store. The climate crisis is already unfolding. You likely know this. But you probably don't know just how severe it will be, and just how soon the consequences will be felt. Barring drastic and immediate action, the earth is headed for warming levels that have been called "beyond catastrophic." We may reach these levels even within the next half century. In this class, we'll survey the range of impacts of the climate crisis, seeking to answer that fundamental question: Will humanity survive?


E3874: A Flyby of Orbital Mechanics in Sprout Fall 2019 (Sep. 28 - Oct. 12, 2019)
Have you ever wondered why rockets have "launch windows," how some satellites always stay directly overhead, why rovers are only sent to Mars every 26 months, or how scientists detect exoplanets thousands of light-years away? What if I told you that for a capsule to catch up to the International Space Station, it actually has to slow down? The physics of orbiting objects can be strange, but we'll cover all these things (and more), predict some upcoming astronomical events, and maybe even plan an interplanetary mission of our own!


E3696: So What's an Ortnithopter? in Splash Spring 19 (Apr. 06, 2019)
Ornithopters have been around for quite a while. But what exactly is one, how do they fly, what distinguishes an ornithopter from other flying machines, and what about their uniqueness makes them useful? In this class we will dig through the history and origin of ornithopters, analyze the basic physics behind several popular designs, and take a peek at modern applications.


E3712: FIRST Robotics Strategy Discussion in Splash Spring 19 (Apr. 06, 2019)
This "class" is a discussion about strategy in FIRST Robotics. There are a few specific historic points to cover, from Team Hammond in 2001 through the Pool Noodle Agreement of 2015 to 254's undefeated season just last year. We'll examine these strategies and break down their strengths and vulnerabilities. I love FRC and hope you all do as well, so besides that we can take it in whatever direction you all are most interested in. Some possible topics include: Designing for ranking points/maximizing score Doing one task well/jack-of-all-trades Strategies that depend on partners Building the "best" drivetrain Denying points/chokehold strategies The (underappreciated) opportunities of your Bumpers! Anything FRC y'all want!