ESP Biography



EMILY WANG, Yale student




Major: Not available.

College/Employer: Yale

Year of Graduation: 2022

Picture of Emily Wang

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Emily Wang is a freshman at Yale College.
You can reach her at emily.wang.ew487@yale.edu



Past Classes

  (Look at the class archive for more.)


Discussion on Criminal Justice in Sprout Spring 19 (Feb. 16 - Mar. 02, 2019)
An eye for an eye? A head for an eye? Thirty years for an eye? In this seminar-style class, we will look at the ways in which justice was served (or not served) at various points in history. We'll also consider hypothetical cases to explore some "side effects" of our judicial process. Some of the topics we'll be discussing: -the Nuremberg trials and the idea of victor's justice -Blackstone's formulation: "It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer" -incentive structures behind plea bargaining and "flipping" -insanity, impossibility, lawful capacity, and lesser harm defenses -trial by fire and systems of justice in pre-modern times -societal functions of courts/prisons and their actors (lawyer, jury, executioner) If there is anything else that particularly interests you, feel free to bring it up in class or email the teacher ahead of time!


Introduction to Ethics [Core] in Sprout Fall 18 (Sep. 29 - Oct. 13, 2018)
In this introductory course on moral philosophy, we'll look at ethics questions both in the abstract and through their real-life applications in politics, economics, and medicine. For example: -Terrorists have kidnapped you and sentenced you to death by torture. Do you want your government to negotiate for your release? -Your contributions to society are valued at $300,000/year while I am paid a mere $3,000 for mine. We both need the same organ transplant. Who should get it? -I smoke cigarettes and shave 5 years off my lifespan. After I die, my friend quits smoking and lives an extra 6 years. Was my death worth it? -Your close relative just blew up a building causing dozens of deaths. Do you turn them in to the police? This class will be seminar-style, so get excited for a lively discussion and get ready to play the devil's advocate! Note: This is a core class. For a less intensive version of the same course, please see the electives section.


Discussion on Criminal Justice [Elective] in Sprout Fall 18 (Sep. 29 - Oct. 13, 2018)
An eye for an eye? A head for an eye? Thirty years for an eye? In this seminar-style class, we will look at the ways in which justice was served (or not served) at various points in history. We'll also consider hypothetical cases to explore some "side effects" of our judicial process. Some of the topics we'll be discussing: -the Nuremberg trials and the idea of victor's justice -Blackstone's formulation: "It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer" -incentive structures behind plea bargaining and "flipping" -insanity, impossibility, lawful capacity, and lesser harm defenses -trial by fire and systems of justice in pre-modern times -societal functions of courts/prisons and their actors (lawyer, jury, executioner) If there is anything else that particularly interests you, feel free to bring it up in class or email the teacher ahead of time! Note: This is an elective class. For a more in-depth version of the same course, please see the core classes section.


Discussion on Criminal Justice [Core] in Sprout Fall 18 (Sep. 29 - Oct. 13, 2018)
An eye for an eye? A head for an eye? Thirty years for an eye? In this seminar-style class, we will look at the ways in which justice was served (or not served) at various points in history. We'll also consider hypothetical cases to explore some "side effects" of our judicial process. Some of the topics we'll be discussing: -the Nuremberg trials and the idea of victor's justice -Blackstone's formulation: "It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer" -incentive structures behind plea bargaining and "flipping" -insanity, impossibility, lawful capacity, and lesser harm defenses -trial by fire and systems of justice in pre-modern times -societal functions of courts/prisons and their actors (lawyer, jury, executioner) If there is anything else that particularly interests you, feel free to bring it up in class or email the teacher ahead of time! Note: This is a core class. For a less intensive version of the same course, please see the electives section.


Introduction to Ethics [Elective] in Sprout Fall 18 (Sep. 29 - Oct. 13, 2018)
In this introductory course on moral philosophy, we'll look at ethics questions both in the abstract and through their real-life applications in politics, economics, and medicine. For example: -Terrorists have kidnapped you and sentenced you to death by torture. Do you want your government to negotiate for your release? -Your contributions to society are valued at $300,000/year while I am paid a mere $3,000 for mine. We both need the same organ transplant. Who should get it? -I smoke cigarettes and shave 5 years off my lifespan. After I die, my friend quits smoking and lives an extra 6 years. Was my death worth it? -Your close relative just blew up a building causing dozens of deaths. Do you turn them in to the police? This class will be seminar-style, so get excited for a lively discussion and get ready to play the devil's advocate! Note: This is an elective class. For a more in-depth version of the same course, please see the core classes section.